JATAKA TALES

South East Asian Folklore and Fairytales

Book 3
Abela Publishing Ltd
3
Free sample

The Jatakas, or birth-stories, form one of Buddhism's sacred books. They relate the adventures of the Buddha in his former existences. Carved railings around the relic shrines of Sanchi in Madhya Pradesh and Amaravati in Andhra Pradesh indicate that the birth-stories were widely known in the third century B.C. 

These Jataka Tales contain deep truths, and are calculated to impress lessons of great moral beauty. Tales like The Merchant of Seri, who gave up all that he had in exchange for a golden dish, embodies much the same idea as the New Testament's parable of the priceless pearl. The Tale of the Measures of Rice illustrates the importance of a true estimate of values. The Tale of the Banyan Deer, which offered its life to save a roe and her young, illustrates self-sacrifice of the noblest sort. The Tale of the Sandy Road is one of the finest in the collection. 

While some of the stories are based in Buddhist ideology, many are age-old fables, the flotsam and jetsam of folk-lore that have appeared under various guises throughout the centuries. At times they have been used merely as merry tales, and at other times they're used as literature, as by Chaucer, who unwittingly puts a Jataka story into the mouth of his Pardoner when he tells the tale of The Ryotoures Three

Captivate yourself with the charm of these 18 Jataka Tales. Let their quaint humour and gentle earnestness teach you the wholesome lessons of the Buddhist ideology, among them the duty of kindness to animals. 

 10% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to raising funds for Phaung Daw Oo Monastic Education High School in Mandalay, Myanmar

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Additional Information

Publisher
Abela Publishing Ltd
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Published on
Oct 31, 2009
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Pages
105
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ISBN
9781907256202
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Language
English
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Genres
Comics & Graphic Novels / Manga / Children's Books & Fairy Tales
Fiction / Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / Country & Ethnic
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
Social Science / Folklore & Mythology
Young Adult Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / Anthologies
Young Adult Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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The 48  Folk-Tales in this book hail from the South East Asian land-locked country of Laos.

Herein are stories like The Enchanted Mountain, The Spirit-Guarded Cave, The Monkeys and the Crabs, The Origin of Lightning (a tale which seems to be endemic amongst all the world’s cultures,) The Faithful Husband, The Cheating Priest and many more children’s stories which cover Romance and Tragedy, Temples and Priests, Moderation and Greed, Parables and Proverbs and The Wonders of Wisdom. There is also a small collection of Stories which went Astray.

 

When these were first gathered by Katherine Neville Fleeson, the country was a part of the kingdom of Siam, and are uniquely South East Asian in their charm and complete novelty. Until the translator of this volume collected these stories, they were even unwritten, with a single exception which was found in an ancient Laos manuscript. They are, and have been, orally preserved in the provinces which constitute the Laos country, just as they have been handed down from generation to generation, with slight variations in words or incidents. In older times, village elders would tell the stories at their merrymakings around the camp-fires and within their primitive houses, to amuse and instruct the youth and children. However, with the advent of the electronic age, this tradition is being lost, and the more the pity for it.

 

To the Scholar, who is a student of the world's Folk-Lore, you may be assured that you have here a small window in history with the tales of Laos, unobscured, just as they were told when this volume was published in 1899.

 

It is said that Filipinos have always been awed by the fairy tales and epics from other lands. This is to be expected as the Philippines has been a cross-roads on the fabled Spice Route for hundreds of years. It is also to be expected that traders brought wonderful tales of far-off lands. From the west tales of Egypt, Arabia and India and from the North and East, tales of Siam, Sind and Nippon. 

In this volume you will find the tale of Harisaboqued, King of a Mountain. A legend of the Volcano of Canlaon on the island of Negros. The volcano is still active, and the smoke and steam which are still emitted from its crater gave rise to the story. There is also the poetic story of the Pericos bird and of Quicoy and the Ongloc (the Ongoloc is known in the West as the Bogy-man). Of particular interest is their Creation Story. How the progeny from the marriage of the children of Gods populated the earth and how their offspring came to have different coloured skins. 

It is not surprising, therefore, that most Filipinos considered their local folklore and tales to be somewhat inferior when compared to these exotic stories. But, there is no reason for this. The myths and folk-lore of the Philippines are as beautiful and rich as those of other lands, coloured by the many people and cultures who have influenced the country. 

So join with us and journey back to a time when these stories were told around campfires, to the delight of young and old alike. The tales gathered here share the charm, depth and variety of what it means to be Filipino. 33% of the net profit will be donated to charities which specialise in education scholarships. Yesterday's Books for Tomorrow's Educations

THE STORIES in this collection were recorded from the lips of over sixty negro story-tellers in the remote country districts of Jamaica during two visits to the island in the summer of 1919 and the winter of 1921. The role of Anansi, the trickster spider, is akin to the Native American Coyote and the (Southern African) Bantu Hare.

 

Herein you will find 149 Anansi tales and a further 18 Witticisms. The stories are categorised into Animal Stories, Old Stories (chiefly of sorcery), Dance and Song and Witticisms. You will find stories as varied in title and content as “The Fish-Basket”, “The Storm“, “The King's Two Daughters”, “The Gub-Gub Peas”, “Simon Tootoos”, “The Tree-Wife” and many, many more unique tales.

 

In some instances, Martha Warren Beckwith was able to record musical notation to accompany the stories. As such you will find these scattered throughout the book. In this way the original style of the story-telling, which in some instances mingles story, song and dance, is as nearly as possible preserved.

 

Two influences have dominated story-telling in Jamaica, the first an absorbing interest in the magical effect of song which far surpasses that in the action of the story; the second, the conception of the spider Anansi as the trickster hero among a group of animal figures. "Anansi stories" regularly form the entertainment during wake-nights, and it is difficult not to believe that the vividness with which these animal actors take part in the story springs from the idea that they really represent the dead in the underworld whose spirits have the power, according to the native belief, of taking animal form. In the local culture, magic songs are often used in communicating with the

dead, and the obeah-man who sets a ghost upon an enemy often sends it in the form of some animal; hence there are animals which must be carefully handled lest they be something other than they appear. The importance of animal stories is further illustrated by the fact that animal stories form the greater part of this volume.

 

33% of the net profit from the sale of this book will be donated to Sentebale, a charity supporting children orphaned by AIDS in Lesotho.

This is a book of Russian folklore retold for young people and the young at heart. The tales are a good sampling of Slavic marchen. The stories in this book are those that Russian peasants tell their children and each other. This is a book written far away in Russia, for English children who play in deep lanes with wild roses above them in the high hedges, or by the small singing becks that dance down the gray fells at home. Russian fairyland is quite different. Under the windows of the author's house, the wavelets of the Volkhov River are beating quietly in the dusk. A gold light burns on a timber raft floating down the river. Beyond the river in the blue midsummer twilight is the broad Russian steppe and the distant forests of Novgorod. Somewhere in that forest of great trees--a forest so big that the forests of England are little woods beside it--is the hut where old Peter sits at night and tells these stories to his grandchildren. In Russia hardly anybody is too old for fairy stories, and the author even overheard soldiers on their way to the WWI talking of very wise and very beautiful princesses as they drank their tea by the side of the road. He believed there must be more fairy stories told in Russia than anywhere else in the world. In this book are a few of those he liked best. The author spent time in Russia during World War I as a journalist for the radical British newspaper, the Daily News, meeting among others, Lenin and Trotsky and was also known in the London bohemian artistic scene. 33% of the net from the sale of this book will be donated to charities for educational purposes. YESTERDAY'S BOOKS for TOMORROW'S EDUCATIONS
A GREAT READ FOR YOUNG PRINCES, PRINCESSES and THOSE WHO LOVE ADVENTURER!

These two books are a treasure chest of 76 classic Gypsy Folk Tales and Stories, and makes fascinating reading for those interested in folklore in general, but especially for those interested in the original Roma, or Gypsy, people.

Two unique volumes of Gypsy tales full of Gypsy mischief, adventure and romance containing 76 unique Gypsy folk tales from Turkey, Romania, Bukowina, Transylvania, Slovakia, Moravia, Bohemia, Poland, England, Wales and Scotland.

In book one you will find stories from Turkish, Romanian and Bukowina Gypsies and in book two tales from from Transylvania, Slovakia, Moravia, Bohemia, Poland, England, Wales and Scotland.


In book 2 you will find tales like The Vampire, The Gypsy and the Priest, Baldplate, The Deluded Dragon, The Jealous Husband, The Creation of the Violin, The Three Girls, Bobby Rag, De Little Fox, the Old Smith, The Princess and the Forester's Son and many, many more.

Francis Hindes Groome collated and published this collection in 1899, making only few changes and remaining true to the original stories, so to let the written story enchant us as if it were being told in the vernacular. 

The stories are further enhanced by the numerous impressive black and white and colour illustrations recently completed by Maggie Gunzel the Dutch artist and illustrator who, unlike many illustrators of the 19th C. and 20th C, has stayed true to the subject matter.

A percentage of the net sale from this book will be donated to the RELIEF FUND FOR ROMANIA.

See the book's webpage for a full list of the 76 tales in this exquisite volume.

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