Sully: My Search for What Really Matters

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Now a major motion picture from Clint Eastwood, starring Tom Hanks—the inspirational autobiography by one of the most captivating American heroes of our time, Capt. ‘Sully’ Sullenberger—the pilot who miraculously landed a crippled US Airways Flight 1549 in New York’s Hudson River, saving the lives of all 155 passengers and crew.

On January 15, 2009, the world witnessed a remarkable emergency landing when Captain "Sully" Sullenberger skillfully glided US Airways Flight 1549 onto the Hudson River, saving the lives of all 155 passengers and crew. His cool actions not only averted tragedy but made him a hero and an inspiration worldwide. His story is now a major motion picture from director / producer Clint Eastwood and stars Tom Hanks, Laura Linney and Aaron Eckhart.

Sully's story is one of dedication, hope, and preparedness, revealing the important lessons he learned through his life, in his military service, and in his work as an airline pilot. It reminds us all that, even in these days of conflict, tragedy and uncertainty, there are values still worth fighting for—that life's challenges can be met if we're ready for them.

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About the author

Chesley B. "Sully" Sullenberger, III has been dedicated to the pursuit of safety for his entire adult life. While he is best known for serving as Captain during what has been called the "Miracle on the Hudson," Sullenberger is a speaker, aviation safety expert, and accident investigator, serves as the CBS News Aviation and Safety Expert, and is the founder and chief executive officer of Safety Reliability Methods, Inc., a company dedicated to management, safety, performance, and reliability consulting. He lives with his family in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Jeffrey Zaslow was a Wall Street Journal columnist, and, with Randy Pausch, coauthor of The Last Lecture, and the author of The Girls from Ames. Zaslow died in 2012 at the age of 53.

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4.5
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Additional Information

Publisher
HarperCollins
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Published on
Aug 9, 2016
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Pages
368
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ISBN
9780062643148
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
Biography & Autobiography / Rich & Famous
Transportation / Aviation / History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST • This exquisite memoir by an idealistic young neurosurgeon asks What makes a life worth living? and makes a profound graduation gift—especially for aspiring doctors and nurses.

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY
The New York Times Book Review • People • NPR • The Washington Post • Slate • Harper’s Bazaar • Esquire • Time Out New York • Publishers Weekly • BookPage

Finalist for the PEN Center USA Literary Award in Creative Nonfiction and the Books for a Better Life Award in Inspirational Memoir

At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi’s transformation from a naïve medical student “possessed,” as he wrote, “by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life” into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality.

What makes life worth living in the face of death? What do you do when the future, no longer a ladder toward your goals in life, flattens out into a perpetual present? What does it mean to have a child, to nurture a new life as another fades away? These are some of the questions Kalanithi wrestles with in this profoundly moving, exquisitely observed memoir.

Paul Kalanithi died in March 2015, while working on this book, yet his words live on as a guide and a gift to us all. “I began to realize that coming face to face with my own mortality, in a sense, had changed nothing and everything,” he wrote. “Seven words from Samuel Beckett began to repeat in my head: ‘I can’t go on. I’ll go on.’” When Breath Becomes Air is an unforgettable, life-affirming reflection on the challenge of facing death and on the relationship between doctor and patient, from a brilliant writer who became both.

Praise for When Breath Becomes Air

“I guarantee that finishing this book and then forgetting about it is simply not an option. . . . Part of this book’s tremendous impact comes from the obvious fact that its author was such a brilliant polymath. And part comes from the way he conveys what happened to him—passionately working and striving, deferring gratification, waiting to live, learning to die—so well.”—Janet Maslin, The New York Times

“An emotional investment well worth making: a moving and thoughtful memoir of family, medicine and literature. It is, despite its grim undertone, accidentally inspiring.”—The Washington Post

“Possesses the gravity and wisdom of an ancient Greek tragedy . . . [Kalanithi] delivers his chronicle in austere, beautiful prose. The book brims with insightful reflections on mortality that are especially poignant coming from a trained physician familiar with what lies ahead.”—The Boston Globe

“Devastating and spectacular . . . [Kalanithi] is so likeable, so relatable, and so humble, that you become immersed in his world and forget where it’s all heading.”—USA Today
Am 15. Januar 2009 startet der Inlandsflug 1549 in New York. In einer Höhe von etwa 1000 Metern – die Maschine befindet sich gerade über der Bronx – kollidiert ein Schwarm Wildgänse mit dem Airbus, an Bord sind 150 Passagiere und fünf Besatzungsmitglieder. Kapitän Sullenberger meldet Schubverlust in beiden Triebwerken und entscheidet sich wegen der geringen Flughöhe für eine hochriskante Notwasserung. Nur sechs dramatische Minuten nach dem Start trifft die Maschine im Gleitflug auf dem Hudson auf, rund anderthalb Kilometer vom Times Square entfernt. Rettungskräften gelingt die Evakuierung der Passagiere. Die Bilder von der spektakulären Landung und Rettungsaktion gehen bald um die Welt.

Chesley Sullenberger, der sich eher ungern als »Der Held vom Hudson« tituliert sah, blickt nun auf sein Leben zurück und beschreibt, wie er zu dem Ausnahmepiloten wurde, der in schwierigster Notsituation Augenmaß und Entschlusskraft bewahrt und der Verantwortung für die ihm anvertrauten Mitmenschen gerecht wird. Er berichtet von seiner Kindheit in Texas, wie er bereits im Alter von fünf Jahren den Traum hegte, Pilot zu werden, und bereits mit sechzehn seinen ersten Soloflug bestritt; er erzählt von den prägenden Jahren bei der Air Force und seinen Erlebnissen als Flugkapitän, seit er 1980 zur zivilen Luftfahrt wechselte.

Sullenberger ist überzeugt, dass seine gesammelten Lebenserfahrungen ihn auf die dramatischen Augenblicke, die sein Leben radikal verändern sollten und die er minutiös und mitreißend schildert, vorbereitet haben, als er sich – entgegen der Anweisung aus dem Flughafentower – für die Landung im Hudson entschied. Hier, so der Kapitän, konnte er auf all das an Einsichten und Tugenden zurückgreifen, was er nicht nur in seinem Beruf, sondern für sein gesamtes Leben als unerlässlich ansieht: Disziplin und Pflichtgefühl, Genauigkeit und Sorgfalt, Verantwortungsgefühl und Vertrauen, aber auch den Mut, notfalls im Alleingang eine Entscheidung zu treffen.



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