Three Kingdoms - a modern interpretation Book 4

Three Kingdoms

Book 4
Dewdrop Publications
Free sample

In spite of having the best generals, Liu Bei was the underdog for the greater half of the Three Kingdoms saga. While occupying Xuzhou, Lu Bu pushed him out. After establishing a base in Ji Nan, he was crushed by Cao Cao’s army. At his wits end, he sought refuge with his relative Liu Biao and tried to building up another base in Xin Ye. But Liu Biao’s in-laws became envious and suspicious. They plotted to kill him and as if he didn’t have enough trouble, Cao Cao found him.

A fortuitous meeting with Master Shui Jing brought his attention to Sleeping Dragon and Rising Phoenix. Shui Jing was confident that Liu Bei would be successful if either one of them came under his employment. He found Sleeping Dragon, but then, Cao Cao attacked.

Hopelessly outnumbered, Liu Bei seemed doomed. Would his Sleeping Dragon in the form of Zhuge Liang save him?

Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Dewdrop Publications
Read more
Collapse
Pages
54
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Best For
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
History / Asia / China
History / Asia / Southeast Asia
History / General
History / Military / Strategy
History / Military / Wars & Conflicts (Other)
Literary Collections / Asian / Chinese
Literary Criticism / Asian / Chinese
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
 Move to Thailand? Are you crazy? Some may ask. But in reality, Thailand is an attractive place with great food, cheap medicines, first class healthcare and wellness support and lots of friendly people who really know how to enjoy life. Those who peel surface that most casual visitors and armchair travellers see will discover that Thailand is a lot more than the sex and human trafficking capital as depicted by the Western media. There are very valid reasons why perfectly decent folks are so keen on living there. But ... what happens if the keen Farang settler peels deeper under the surface of the fun and friendly Thai people?

 Written by author of Spellbound in Chiangmai and Understanding Thailand's Money Culture, this book takes you on a journey from fascination to infatuation, then to realization and finally disillusionment - stages that many foreigners go through when they decide to settle down in the Land of Smiles after seeing all the good things about it.

 Chapters in the book include:

 Low Cost Of Living

Thai Hospitality & Tolerance

Oriental Wisdom

Sabai Sabai

The Tough and the Geek

 Reality - Complacency

 Reality – How Calm Are They?

 Reality - Education

 Reality – Belief in Miracles

 Reality – The Price of Reputation

 The Real Thai Values

 Reality – Do You Know Your Rank?

Reality – the Gods Themselves

The Problem With Mai Pen Rai

Mai Pen Rai In Reverse

Farang Remain Farang

Honesty & Rule of Law

It Gets Even More Absurd

The Truth – Distaff Attractions

Stage One – Infatuation

Why Thai Women?

Stage Two - Discovery

How The Good Girls Do It

Impermanence

Stage Three - Denial Or Compromise

Sneaky & Superficial

Repackaged in a new tie-in edition to coincide with the Netflix film produced and directed by Angelina Jolie, a moving story of war crimes and desperate actions, the unnerving strength of a small girl and her triumphant spirit as she survived the Cambodian genocide under Pol Pot’s brutal regime.

Until the age of five, Loung Ung lived in Phnom Penh, one of seven children of a high-ranking government official. She was a precocious child who loved the open city markets, fried crickets, chicken fights, and sassing her parents. While her beautiful mother worried that Loung was a troublemaker—that she stomped around like a thirsty cow—her beloved father knew Loung was a clever girl.

When Pol Pot’s Khmer Rouge army stormed into Phnom Penh in April 1975, Ung’s family fled their home and moved from village to village to hide their identity, their education, their former life of privilege. Eventually, the family dispersed in order to survive. Loung trained as a child soldier in a work camp for orphans, while other siblings were sent to labor camps. As the Vietnamese penetrated Cambodia, destroying the Khmer Rouge, Loung and her surviving siblings were slowly reunited.

Bolstered by the shocking bravery of one brother, the courage and sacrifices of the rest of her family—and sustained by her sister’s gentle kindness amid brutality—Loung forged on to create for herself a courageous new life. Harrowing yet hopeful, insightful and compelling, this story is truly unforgettable.

 

This epic saga of brotherhood and rivalry, of loyalty and treachery, of victory and death forms part of the indelible core of classical Chinese culture and continues to fascinate modern-day readers.

In 220 EC, the 400-year-old rule of the mighty Han dynasty came to an end and three kingdoms contested for control of China. Liu Pei, the legitimate heir to the Han throne, elects to fight for his birthright and enlists the aid of his sworn brothers, the impulsive giant Chang Fei and the invincible knight Kuan Yu. The brave band faces a formidable array of enemies, foremost among them the treacherous and bloodthirsty Ts'ao Ts'ao. The bold struggle of the three heroes seems doomed until the reclusive wizard Chuko Liang offers his counsel, and the tide begins to turn.

Romance of the Three Kingdoms is China's oldest novel and the first of a great tradition of historical fiction. Believed to have been compiled by the play-wright Lo Kuan-chung in the late fourteenth century, it is indebted to the great San-kuo chi (Chronicles of the Three Kingdoms) completed by the historian Ch'en Shou just before his death in 297 CE. The novel first appeared in print in 1522. This edition, translated in the mid-1920s by C. H. Brewitt-Taylor, is based on a shortened and simplified version which appeared in the 1670s. An Introduction to this reprint by Robert E. Hegel, Professor of Chinese and Comparative Literature at Washington University, provides an insightful commentary on the historical background to the novel, its literary origins and its main characters.
©2020 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.