Escape from the Village

Chris Baker
3
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"An eleven-year-old girl and boy live in an isolated village with 258
other citizens. Nobody has a name, and everything is calculated to break
their spirits so that they surrender to an existence of gray routine.

"But they have each other. They each have a passion: music and art. And
a mysterious force is guiding them and protecting them.

"When the
savagery of those in control finally transforms the girl, the boy must
help her find herself again. The path is an amazing journey through
which they discover the depths of their humanity and a startling method
to shake the village at its roots. Perhaps they can shift the world
toward happiness. 

"Escape from the Village is an homage to
true friendship which can sustain the human spirit even against physical
and spiritual torture. It is a touching love story like no other."

--Wendy McElroy

She draws the pictures. He makes the music. They both share a big secret.

There is no music or art in the village where a pre-adolescent boy and
girl live. They go to a mysterious house where they make music and art, while
other citizens can not go there. Their creativity separates them from
their peers in many ways. They will soon discover that there is much
more being kept from them.

Take the grim dystopia of the Hunger Games and combine it with the charm of Moonrise Kingdom--the result is Escape from the Village.

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About the author

Chris Baker was born and raised in the Northern Panhandle of West Virginia and currently lives in Austin, Texas. He has also lived in northwest Washington and Columbus, Ohio.

He has been published in a wide range of publications and is writing novels again. He also takes acting classes and is a senior green belt in tae kwon do.

 web site: www.chrisbaker.net

Twitter: @cbakerauthor

e-mail: escape(at)chrisbaker(dot)net

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Additional Information

Publisher
Chris Baker
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Published on
Nov 5, 2013
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Pages
156
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Language
English
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The German offensive in Flanders in April 1918 came close to catastrophe for the British Armies, but ultimately ended in strategic defeat for the Kaisers men. Following closely on the heels of the devastating Operation Michael attack in March on the Somme and around Arras, named as Operation Georgette, the offensive was aimed at strangling the vital railways and roads that supplied the British at Ypres.Having assembled an overwhelming numerical advantage, the Germans attacked in thick fog on 9 April 1918. They faced tired British formations that had just been relieved from the earlier battle and which were receiving replacements, mainly in the form of 18 year-old conscripts. By the days end, the Germans had succeeded in gaining a crossing of the River Lys and were well on their way to the vital railway junctions at Hazebrouck. Several British divisions were deployed to stop the advance, only to be effectively destroyed in the attempt over the next few days. Gradually, fresher British, Australian and French reserves arrived and held their ground. With disappointing results, mounting casualties and a diminishing return for their efforts, the Germans abandoned the offensive and turned their attention further south.What the British call The Battle of the Lys 1918 is a fascinating yet curiously neglected period of military history. Chris Baker examines this major battle from the strategic down to the platoon level, highlighting the key events, characters and acts of enormous bravery on both sides, both in a historical narrative and in a series of tours of the area.This volume, one of two on the battle, concentrates on the southern half of the battlefield.
The second of two Battelground Europe titles covering this highly significant battle of spring 1918.The German offensive in Flanders in April 1918 came close to catastrophe for the British Armies, but ultimately ended in strategic defeat for the Kaisers men. Following close on the heels of the devastating Operation Michael attack in March, which had been aimed against the British front on the Somme and Arras, this offensive, Operation Georgette, was aimed at strangling the vital railways and roads that supplied the British at Ypres and threatening the vital logistics links with the Channel Ports.Having assembled an overwhelming numerical advantage, the Germans attacked in thick fog on 9 April 1918. By days end, the Germans had succeeded in gaining a crossing of the River Lys and were well on their way to the railway junctions at Hazebrouck. Next day, they extended the attacked front northwards and advanced to the very gates of Ypres, forcing a British retirement from the bloodily won advances during the Third Battle of Ypres. Messines Ridge, captured so spectacularly by the British in June 1917, was soon in German hands and fighting inched towards Mont Kemmel, which dominated the Ypres front. Once this fell, the way was open for the capture of the main supply roads into Ypres.To find sufficient reserves to counter the German attack, the British took the heart-breaking decision to abandon the ground won so dearly in the Passchendaele offensive in the summer and autumn of 1917. Gradually, fresher British and French reserves arrived and held their ground. With disappointing results, mounting casualties and a diminishing return for their efforts, the Germans paused to regroup. Late in the month they unleashed a rapid, unstoppable attack that captured Kemmel from the French forces that had been rushed north to reinforce the threatened line and which had been holding the summit: one of the finest military feats of the Great War.Behind the scenes, however, the Germans were already calling off a continuation of the offensive and so, by a seeming miracle, the bastion that was Ypres remained in British hands.What the British call The Battle of the Lys 1918 is a fascinating yet curiously neglected period of military history. Chris Baker examines this major battle from the strategic down to the platoon level, highlighting the key events, characters and acts of enormous bravery on both sides, both in historical narrative and in a series of tours of the area.This volume concentrates on the northern half of the battlefield; nearly all of the actions described in this volume took place in Belgium.
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