The Britons

The Peoples of Europe

Book 9
Sold by John Wiley & Sons
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This book provides a fascinating and unique history of the Britons from the late Iron Age to the late Middle Ages. It also discusses the revivals of interest in British culture and myth over the centuries, from Renaissance antiquarians to modern day Druids.

  • A fascinating and unique history of the Britons from the late Iron Age to the late Middle Ages.
  • Describes the life, language and culture of the Britons before, during and after Roman rule.
  • Examines the figures of King Arthur and Merlin and the evolution of a powerful national mythology.
  • Proposes a new theory on the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain and the establishment of separate Brittonic kingdoms.
  • Discusses revivals of interest in British culture and myth, from Renaissance antiquarians to modern day Druids.
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About the author

Christopher A. Snyder is Associate Professor of European History and Chair of the Department of History and Politics at Marymount University in Arlington, Virginia. He is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland and a frequent lecturer at the Smithsonian Institution. His previous books include Exploring the World of King Arthur (2000) and An Age of Tyrants: Britain and the Britons, AD 400-600 (1998).
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Additional Information

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Apr 15, 2008
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Pages
352
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ISBN
9780470758212
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / Medieval
History / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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NOTE: This edition does not include color images.
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