Gathering Hopewell: Society, Ritual and Ritual Interaction

Springer Science & Business Media
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Among the most socially and personally vocal archaeological remains on the North American continent are the massive and often complexly designed earthen architecture of Hopewellian peoples of two thousand years ago, their elaborately embellished works of art made of glistening metals and stones from faraway places, and their highly formalized mortuaries. In this book, twenty-one researchers in interwoven efforts immerse themselves and the reader in this vibrant archaeological record in order to richly reconstruct the societies, rituals, and ritual interactions of Hopewellian peoples.

By finding the faces, actions, and motivations of Hopewellian peoples as individuals who constructed knowable social roles, the authors explore, in a personalized and locally contextualized manner, the details of Hopewellian life: leadership, its sacred and secular power bases, recruitment, and formalization over time; systems of social ranking and prestige; animal-totemic clan organization, kinship structures, and sodalities; gender roles, prestige, work load, and health; community organization in its tri-scalar residential, symbolic, and demographic forms; intercommunity alliances and changes in their strategies and expanses over time; and interregional travels for power questing, pilgrimage, healing, tutelage, and acquiring ritual knowledge.

This book is useful to scholars, graduate students, and advanced undergraduates interested in the workings and development of social complexity at local and interregional scales, recent theoretical developments in the anthropology of the topics listed above, the prehistory of eastern North America, its history of intellectual development, and Native American ritual, symbolism, and belief.

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About the author

CHRISTOPHER CARR is Associate Professor of International Security at the U.S. Air War College. He has written and researched on the trade in arms and on the impact of light weapons proliferation on vulnerable societies and is the author of Security Implications of Microdisarmament (2000). He is a contributor to James Forest's Countering Terrorism and Insurgency in the 21st Century, 3 Volumes (Praeger Security International, 2007). Carr earned his Ph.D. in International Relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Mar 30, 2006
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Pages
807
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ISBN
9780387273273
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Ancient / General
History / General
Social Science / Anthropology / General
Social Science / Archaeology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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