Racism, Sexism, and the Media: Multicultural Issues Into the New Communications Age, Edition 4

SAGE Publications
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The Fourth Edition of Racism, Sexism, and the Media examines how different race, ethnic, and gender groups fit into the fabric of America; how the media influence and shape everyone's perception of how they fit; and how the media and advertisers are continuously adapting their communications to effectively reach these groups. The authors explore how the rise of class/group-focused communication, resulting from the convergence of new media technologies and continued demographic segmentation of audiences, has led media outlets and advertisers to see women and people of color as influential key audiences and target markets, as well as a source of stereotypes, which may lead to media insensitivity and may help perpetuate social inequity. The Fourth Edition includes updated content on topics covered in the previous editions, and new material on: women of color, including an integrated assessment of their media experiences; new material on Muslim, Arab, and Asian groups; new technologies; and social media use and their impact
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About the author

Clint C. Wilson II, EdD is professor of Journalism at the Howard University School of Communications and graduate professor in its Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. A recipient of the Honor Medal for Distinguished Service in Journalism from the University of Missouri, Wilson has published scholarly work on the relationship between people of color and mainstream general circulation media in Journalism Educator, Columbia Journalism Review, Quill, and Change. His professional journalism career includes work for various news media organizations, including the Associated Press, Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, St. Petersburg Times, USA Today.com and the Los Angeles Sentinel.

Félix F. Gutiérrez, PhD, is professor of Journalism and Communication in the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism and professor of American Studies and Ethnicity in the Dana and David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences at the University of Southern California. A former senior vice president of the Newseum and Freedom Forum, his publication credits include five books and more than 50 articles or book chapters on diversity and the media. He received the 2011 Lionel C. Barrow Jr. Award for Distinguished Achievement in Diversity Research and Education of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. The National Association of Hispanic Journalists named him the "Padrino (Godfather) of Hispanic Journalists" in 1995 and inducted him into its Hall of Fame in 2002.

Lena M. Chao is Associate Professor of Communication Studies at California

State University, Los Angeles where she also serves as Director for the

Asian and Asian American Institute. Prior to joining the faculty at CSULA,

she was on the administrative staff of the Media Institute for Minorities at

the University of Southern California and worked as a Public Service

Coordinator at KFWB News radio in Los Angeles. She also has worked at Radio

Espanol and served as Media Director for the American Civil Liberties Union

of Southern California.

Her areas of scholarly specialization include public relations, mass

communication, and intercultural and interpersonal communications. Her

academic work has been published in Human Communication, California Politics

and Policy, and Feedback among others.

She was on the founding board of the Media Action Network for Asian

Americans (MANAA), a watchdog group that monitors communications media in

the United States for fair, balanced and accurate portrayals of Asian

Pacific Americans. Her public service activities also includes membership on

the advisory boards of two non-profit organizations, The Coalition of

Brothers and Sisters Unlimited, and the Estelle Van Meter Multipurpose

Center, both located in South Central Los Angeles. She is Faculty Director

for Service Learning at Cal State L.A., promoting curriculum development and

faculty and student involvement in community service learning opportunities.

Ms. Chao received her B.A. in English Literature from the University of

California, Los Angeles, and her M.S. in Print Journalism and Ph.D. in

Communication Arts and Sciences from the University of Southern California.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SAGE Publications
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Published on
Oct 3, 2012
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Pages
336
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ISBN
9781452290003
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Language
English
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / Communication Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Gerry Spence is perhaps America's most renowned and successful trial lawyer, a man known for his deep convictions and his powerful courtroom presentations when he argues on behalf of ordinary people. Frequently pitted against teams of lawyers thrown against him by major corporate or government interests, he has never lost a criminal case and has not lost a civil jury trial since l969.
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