Pickle Partners Publishing
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Written by the staff of the U.S. 7th Army soon after its liberation, this report stands as evidence of some of the worst crimes of the Holocaust. The images contained within also document the inhuman suffering inflicted at Dachau.

“DACHAU, 1933-1945, will stand for all time as one of history’s most gruesome symbols of inhumanity. There our troops found sights, sounds and stenches horrible beyond belief, cruelties so enormous as to be incomprehensible to the normal mind. DACHAU and death were synonymous.

No words or pictures can carry the full impact of these unbelievable scenes but this report presents some of the outstanding facts and photographs in order to emphasize the type of crime which elements of the SS committed thousands of times a day, to remind us of the ghastly capabilities of certain classes of men, to strengthen our determination that they and their works shall vanish from the earth.

The sections comprising this report were prepared by the agencies indicated. They remain substantially as they were originally submitted in the belief that to consolidate this material in a single literary style would seriously weaken its realism.”-Foreword.
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Pickle Partners Publishing
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Published on
Nov 6, 2015
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History / Holocaust
History / Jewish
History / Middle East / Israel & Palestine
History / Military / World War II
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One of the earliest published accounts of the Nazi concentration camp system, for no crime other than being Jewish Leon Szalet was incarcerated by the Gestapo and experienced the awful torments of Sachsenhausen.

“Long before I became acquainted with a German concentration camp—at the time Germany launched her attack on Poland—I had heard much about the horrors of these German torture chambers. Almost everyone who lived in Germany, native or foreigner, knew of someone who had once been in a concentration camp. Everyone had a vague idea of the punishment cells, whippings, starvation rations. But just how the mechanism of a concentration camp functioned, how a prisoner’s day was spent, how he worked, what he ate, what and how he suffered—these things were known only to those who had once been cogs in such a mechanism.

And these did not speak. They did not speak because the fear of the Gestapo haunted them night and day; because on their release from the camp they were made to sign a statement that they would not make public the things they had seen and experienced; because the Gestapo sent those who broke this pledge back to the camp for “atrocity propaganda”; and because those sent back would soon come out again, this time in a crudely built wooden coffin.

It was a long while before I felt strong enough to describe what I had seen and experienced. That I have been able to put it on paper at all, I owe to my daughter, whose untiring energy and resourcefulness not only accomplished my rescue but has also been an invaluable help in preparing the manuscript.”-Author’s Preface.
Includes 204 photos, plans and maps illustrating The Holocaust

This is the story of No. 22483, who had been shipped from Belgium to Buchenwald. This is an account of what No. 22483 saw and felt during his calvary from Antwerp to the Malin distribution camp in France and from there to the extermination camp of Buchenwald.

To say that this book contains the scenes of a twentieth-century Inferno may sound commonplace. Yet, every page of this book reminds one of Dante’s Inferno, with one exception: the Inferno the author writes about consumed the lives not of the sinful whom divine justice cast into the immortality of suffering.
This Inferno was thronged by millions, many of whom were babies and little children, mothers and young women who had hoped to become mothers. It was thronged with people who deserved their fates because they were men in the sense that God meant them to be. They were in Inferno because they were strong men and brave, the real heroes of our days. They were doomed because the Nazi super-race set up a different scale of values which regarded heroism as the greatest of sins and considered depravity the greatest of virtues. Reading this book one feels that the titanic Dante himself would have been staggered by the demented criminality the judges of the just displayed.

This is the story of No. 22483 of Buchenwald, one of the millions who were doomed and one of the few who escaped. Throughout, the writing is poignant, vibrant with humanity, a cry “de profundis” and a vow that it must never happen again. This book should be long remembered.
Includes 204 photos, plans and maps illustrating The Holocaust

“Fourteen officers of the SS (Elite Guard) were sentenced today to hang for at least a million killings. The sentences wound up the biggest murder trial in history.

The men were leaders of the “Einsatz Kommandos”...special extermination squads sent...to do away with peoples classified by the Nazis as racially undesirable.”—NUREMBERG, APRIL 10 (1948)—(ASSOCIATED PRESS)

After the first Nuremberg trials of the remaining Nazi leaders in 1945-6, the Allies spent much time and effort in searching out the men responsible for the Holocaust, the full scale of which was only then becoming apparent. In the most important case of his career, Judge Michael A. Musmanno (Captain USN), presided over the trial of the leaders of the Einsatz Kommandos, death squads trained to hunt and kill “Untermenschen” or those deemed undesirable by Hitler. Blazing a bloody trail across the conquered areas of Poland, the Ukraine, White Russia and the Baltic states, the Einsatzgruppen shot innocent men, women and children by the tens of thousands. Finding that shooting was an inefficient way to complete their horrendous executions, the Einsatz Kommando leaders pioneered the use of mobile poison gas trucks which would lead to the evolution of the death camps at Auschwitz-Birkenau, Treblinka, Belzec and Sobibor and the industrialised murder of the Holocaust. In this riveting and horrifying book the author looks back on a trial that serves as a testament to the depths of man’s inhumanity; at times almost surreal in its horror it is a story that should be read and re-read.
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