The Book of Revelation

The new Collegeville Bible commentary: New Testament

Book 12
Liturgical Press
Free sample

Full of awesome and gruesome scenes that seem to provoke more fear than faith, the Book of Revelation is often read as a roadmap through the doom and gloom of the end time. Correctly understood, however, this grand finale of the New Testament is aloud and clear call to conversion as well as a message of hope and consolation for Christians of every age.

Catherine Cory carefully explains the variety of Visions that unfold in kaleidoscopic fashion throughout the book. Scenes from the Old Testament form collages that convey the central theme; namely, that God is in control and evil is being conquered. The breathtaking conclusion resounds with God's promise, Behold, I make all things new."

Cory's lucid style reveals the true message of the Book of Revelation.

Catherine Ann Cory, PhD, is an associate professor in the theology department, at the University of Saint Thomas, St.Paul, Minnesota.

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About the author

Catherine Ann Cory, PhD, is an associate professor in the theology department, at the University of Saint Thomas, St. Paul, Minnesota.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Liturgical Press
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Published on
Dec 31, 2006
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Pages
101
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ISBN
9780814628850
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Religion / Biblical Commentary / New Testament
Religion / Christian Theology / General
Religion / Christianity / Catholic
Religion / Spirituality
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This content is DRM protected.
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The Gospel of Matthew carries important lessons on the formation of community and of Jesus as authoritative Teacher--lessons that helped the early Matthean population relate to both the Jewish and Christian communities of which they were composed.

The Gospel According to Matthew provides Gospel text (New American Bible translation) along with Barbara E. Reid's commentary, to aid in the interpretation and use of this Gospel today. As Reid demonstrates, this Gospel continues to bring Vision and hope to Christians throughout the ages.

Reid stresses the importance of the Gospel of Matthew as the first book in the New Testament, possibly the first written Gospel, and the one most often used in the early church. Providing both the text and commentary, Reid addresses important questions such as the author's identity and sources, setting and Gospel translation.

Sections are The Origins of Jesus (1:1-4:11)," "The Beginnings of the Galilean Ministry (4:12-10:42)," "The Sermon on the Mount (5:1-7:28)," "Varying Responses to Jesus(11:1-16:12)," "Jesus and His Disciples on the Way to Jerusalem (16:14- 20:34)," "Jerusalem; Jesus' Final Days of Teaching in the Temple (21:1-28:15)," "Finale: Back to Galilee; Commission to the Whole World; Jesus' Abiding Presence (28:16-20)." Also includes discussion questions.

Barbara E. Reid, OP, PhD, is professor of New Testament at Catholic Theological Union in Chicago. She is the author of Parables for Preachers, Choosing the Better Part?, and co-editor of the Collegeville Pastoral Dictionary of Biblical Theology, published by Liturgical Press. She has also published various journal articles on New Testament topics.

Also available with Little Rock Scripture Study Set: The Gospel According to Matthew

"
New Collegeville Bible Commentary
The Gospel According to Mark
Volume 2

The absence of stories of Jesus' birth and infancy, a minimum of Jesus' parables and a resurrection scene without sight or sound of the risen Jesus have tempted readers to shortchange Mark's Gospel. Thanks to the insightful analysis and inspiring reflections of Marie Noonan Sabin, anyone studying this premier Gospel with her guidance will recognize the genius of the original author.

Sabin asserts that Mark's Gospel is not an eyewitness account or a work of biography or history. She writes, What Mark gives us is far richer. He interprets Jesus in the light of the Hebrew Bible, showing Jesus to be not only a teacher of Wisdom but Wisdom itself, calling his followers to an unconventional wisdom, a way of living (and a way of dying) that he himself exemplifies."

The cover of this commentary from The Saint John's Bible highlights Sabin's thesis that the transfiguration of Jesus is pivotal to the Gospel: "The scene [9:2-8]overshadows both parts of the Gospel, emphasizing God's creative, transforming, transfiguring power to restore life."

Sabin gives special attention to Mark's key words and phrases (e.g., "release," "rise up" or "be raised," "straightway," and "ecstasy") and his pattern of twos and threes. Especially helpful are the summaries at the end of each chapter. Here is a commentary that will restore Mark's prime place among the other two Synoptic Gospels.

Marie Noonan Sabin, Ph.D., has taught the Gospel of Mark at Bangor Theological Seminary; an earlier book on Mark, Reopening the Word, was published by Oxford University Press in 2002.

Dennis Hamm stresses the unity between the Acts of Apostles and the Gospel of Luke. His section-by-section commentary (along with New American Bible translation), based on the best of recent scholarship will appeal to teachers, preachers and Bible study groups with its non-technical, yet scholarly style. Hamm helps visualize Christianity?s growth from Jewish roots and the church as continuation of God?s covenant with Israel. Paying close attention to the use of the Old Testament, Hamm demonstrates how the Acts of the Apostles--first addressed to the early Christian community--speaks to our generation today.Chapters are ?The Risen Christ and the Restoration of Israel in Jerusalem (1:1-8:3),? ?The Mission in Judea and Samaria (8:4-9:43),? ?The Inauguration of the Gentile Mission (10:1-15:35),? and ?The Mission of Paul to the Ends of the Earth (15:36-28:31).? Also includes maps and discussion questions.?Dennis Hamm reads the story of Acts as the dramatic continuation of Luke?s story of Jesus and the longer story of Israel. His interpretation is uncluttered and clear and helpful. He is especially good at showing how Luke uses speeches to interpret events as well as the words of Scripture. Here is a scholarship that makes great learning available to ordinary Christians in a manner that is both responsible and accessible.? Luke Johnson?This work unobtrusively recaps the history of scholarship on Luke-Acts and provides remarkable new insights, all couched in a graphic style with contemporary illustrations that engage the reader on every page. A remarkable achievement in such a short space. This book will inform your mind and build up your faith.? L. John Topel, S.J. Seattle University Author, Children of a Compassionate God
The Gospel of Matthew carries important lessons on the formation of community and of Jesus as authoritative Teacher--lessons that helped the early Matthean population relate to both the Jewish and Christian communities of which they were composed.

The Gospel According to Matthew provides Gospel text (New American Bible translation) along with Barbara E. Reid's commentary, to aid in the interpretation and use of this Gospel today. As Reid demonstrates, this Gospel continues to bring Vision and hope to Christians throughout the ages.

Reid stresses the importance of the Gospel of Matthew as the first book in the New Testament, possibly the first written Gospel, and the one most often used in the early church. Providing both the text and commentary, Reid addresses important questions such as the author's identity and sources, setting and Gospel translation.

Sections are The Origins of Jesus (1:1-4:11)," "The Beginnings of the Galilean Ministry (4:12-10:42)," "The Sermon on the Mount (5:1-7:28)," "Varying Responses to Jesus(11:1-16:12)," "Jesus and His Disciples on the Way to Jerusalem (16:14- 20:34)," "Jerusalem; Jesus' Final Days of Teaching in the Temple (21:1-28:15)," "Finale: Back to Galilee; Commission to the Whole World; Jesus' Abiding Presence (28:16-20)." Also includes discussion questions.

Barbara E. Reid, OP, PhD, is professor of New Testament at Catholic Theological Union in Chicago. She is the author of Parables for Preachers, Choosing the Better Part?, and co-editor of the Collegeville Pastoral Dictionary of Biblical Theology, published by Liturgical Press. She has also published various journal articles on New Testament topics.

Also available with Little Rock Scripture Study Set: The Gospel According to Matthew

"
New Collegeville Bible Commentary
The Gospel According to Mark
Volume 2

The absence of stories of Jesus' birth and infancy, a minimum of Jesus' parables and a resurrection scene without sight or sound of the risen Jesus have tempted readers to shortchange Mark's Gospel. Thanks to the insightful analysis and inspiring reflections of Marie Noonan Sabin, anyone studying this premier Gospel with her guidance will recognize the genius of the original author.

Sabin asserts that Mark's Gospel is not an eyewitness account or a work of biography or history. She writes, What Mark gives us is far richer. He interprets Jesus in the light of the Hebrew Bible, showing Jesus to be not only a teacher of Wisdom but Wisdom itself, calling his followers to an unconventional wisdom, a way of living (and a way of dying) that he himself exemplifies."

The cover of this commentary from The Saint John's Bible highlights Sabin's thesis that the transfiguration of Jesus is pivotal to the Gospel: "The scene [9:2-8]overshadows both parts of the Gospel, emphasizing God's creative, transforming, transfiguring power to restore life."

Sabin gives special attention to Mark's key words and phrases (e.g., "release," "rise up" or "be raised," "straightway," and "ecstasy") and his pattern of twos and threes. Especially helpful are the summaries at the end of each chapter. Here is a commentary that will restore Mark's prime place among the other two Synoptic Gospels.

Marie Noonan Sabin, Ph.D., has taught the Gospel of Mark at Bangor Theological Seminary; an earlier book on Mark, Reopening the Word, was published by Oxford University Press in 2002.

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