Frostbite: A Werewolf Tale

Sold by Broadway Books
20
Free sample

For Cheyenne Clark, there's a bad moon on the rise . . .

There's one sound a woman doesn't want to hear when she's lost and alone in the Arctic wilderness: a howl.

When a strange wolf's teeth slash Cheyenne's ankle to the bone, her old life ends, and she becomes the very monster that has haunted her nightmares for years. Worse, the only one who can understand what Chey has become is the man–or wolf–who's doomed her to this fate. He also wants to chop her head off with an axe.

Yet as the line between human and beast blurs, so too does the distinction between hunter and hunted . . . for Chey is more than just the victim she appears to be. But once she's within killing range, she may find that–even for a werewolf–it's not always easy to go for the jugular.
Read more
Collapse

More by David Wellington

See more
4.1
20 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Broadway Books
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Oct 6, 2009
Read more
Collapse
Pages
288
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9780307460844
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Fiction / Fantasy / Paranormal
Fiction / Horror
Fiction / Thrillers / Supernatural
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
The second entry in this “inventive and exciting” zombie series that began with Monster Island (Publishers Weekly).

This is where it begins. This is where the end of the world begins? She wakes up alone and feeling like she's half-dead. She can't remember her name. She staggers outside, looking for help—and that's when she sees that the dead have returned to life, that zombies are running in the streets and devouring the living. And she's one of them. She isn't breathing. The zombies leave her alone. Because they know she's one of their kind. And yet she differs from the brainless ghouls around her in some crucial ways. Somehow she's kept her intelligence intact, if not her memory. And being dead has certain compensations. She has developed strange powers. She calls herself Nilla, and all she knows is that staying alive only gets harder after you die? Meanwhile the National Guard has its hands full with the worst epidemic ever to strike the American west. From California to Colorado every town, every city is being overrun. Captain Bannerman Clark isn't prepared for this. He's semi-retired and he hasn't fired a gun in years, not since the Vietnam war. Yet it seems there's no one else around to take charge. As the world we know collapses he must find in himself the brains, the guts, and the moral courage to lead the survivors to safety, if there's any to be had. Meanwhile, behind the scenes, shadowy players are just beginning to show their hands. There's more going on here than meets the eye, and Clark and Nilla both have parts to play in a game they can't comprehend? 
From #1 New York Times bestselling author Stephen King, the most riveting and unforgettable story of kids confronting evil since It—publishing just as the second part of It, the movie, lands in theaters.

In the middle of the night, in a house on a quiet street in suburban Minneapolis, intruders silently murder Luke Ellis’s parents and load him into a black SUV. The operation takes less than two minutes. Luke will wake up at The Institute, in a room that looks just like his own, except there’s no window. And outside his door are other doors, behind which are other kids with special talents—telekinesis and telepathy—who got to this place the same way Luke did: Kalisha, Nick, George, Iris, and ten-year-old Avery Dixon. They are all in Front Half. Others, Luke learns, graduated to Back Half, “like the roach motel,” Kalisha says. “You check in, but you don’t check out.”

In this most sinister of institutions, the director, Mrs. Sigsby, and her staff are ruthlessly dedicated to extracting from these children the force of their extranormal gifts. There are no scruples here. If you go along, you get tokens for the vending machines. If you don’t, punishment is brutal. As each new victim disappears to Back Half, Luke becomes more and more desperate to get out and get help. But no one has ever escaped from the Institute.

As psychically terrifying as Firestarter, and with the spectacular kid power of It, The Institute is Stephen King’s gut-wrenchingly dramatic story of good vs. evil in a world where the good guys don’t always win.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.