Uyghurs and Uyghur Identity

Radio Free Asia

Archaeological excavations and historical records show that Uyghur-land is the most important repository of Uyghur and Central Asian treasures.This publication gives the reader a full description of Uyghur cultural identity.

 

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Additional Information

Publisher
Radio Free Asia
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Published on
Oct 26, 2015
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Pages
38
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ISBN
9781632180681
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Asia / Central Asia
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Christopher I. Beckwith
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