Managing Expert Systems

IGI Global
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Managing Expert Systems explores the trends in expert systems development and implementation. As top authorities in the field of ES, Turban and Liebowitz examine the factors that contribute to the development of a successful expert system.
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Publisher
IGI Global
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Published on
Dec 31, 1992
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Pages
484
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ISBN
9781878289117
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Information Management
Business & Economics / Knowledge Capital
Computers / Expert Systems
Computers / Information Technology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Robert Wachter
The New York Times Science Bestseller from Robert Wachter, Modern Healthcare’s #1 Most Influential Physician-Executive in the US

While modern medicine produces miracles, it also delivers care that is too often unsafe, unreliable, unsatisfying, and impossibly expensive. For the past few decades, technology has been touted as the cure for all of healthcare’s ills.

But medicine stubbornly resisted computerization – until now. Over the past five years, thanks largely to billions of dollars in federal incentives, healthcare has finally gone digital.

Yet once clinicians started using computers to actually deliver care, it dawned on them that something was deeply wrong. Why were doctors no longer making eye contact with their patients? How could one of America’s leading hospitals give a teenager a 39-fold overdose of a common antibiotic, despite a state-of-the-art computerized prescribing system? How could a recruiting ad for physicians tout the absence of an electronic medical record as a major selling point?

Logically enough, we’ve pinned the problems on clunky software, flawed implementations, absurd regulations, and bad karma. It was all of those things, but it was also something far more complicated. And far more interesting . . .

Written with a rare combination of compelling stories and hard-hitting analysis by one of the nation’s most thoughtful physicians, The Digital Doctor examines healthcare at the dawn of its computer age. It tackles the hard questions, from how technology is changing care at the bedside to whether government intervention has been useful or destructive. And it does so with clarity, insight, humor, and compassion. Ultimately, it is a hopeful story.

"We need to recognize that computers in healthcare don’t simply replace my doctor’s scrawl with Helvetica 12," writes the author Dr. Robert Wachter. "Instead, they transform the work, the people who do it, and their relationships with each other and with patients. . . . Sure, we should have thought of this sooner. But it’s not too late to get it right."

This riveting book offers the prescription for getting it right, making it essential reading for everyone – patient and provider alike – who cares about our healthcare system.

Jay Liebowitz
Strategic intelligence (SI) has mostly been used in military settings, but its worth goes well beyond that limited role. It has become invaluable for improving any organization's strategic decision making process. The author of Strategic Intelligence: Business Intelligence, Competitive Intelligence, and Knowledge Management recognizes synergies among component pieces of strategic intelligence, and demonstrates how executives can best use this internal and external information toward making better decisions.

Divided into two major parts, the book first discusses the convergence of knowledge management (KM), business intelligence (BI), and competitive intelligence (CI) into what the author defines as strategic intelligence. The second part of the volume describes case studies written by recognized experts in the fields of KM, BI, and CI. The case studies include strategic scenarios at Motorola, AARP, Northrop Grumman, and other market leaders.

About the Editor
Jay Liebowitz, D.Sc., is a full professor in the Graduate Division of Business and Management and program director for the Graduate Certificate in Competitive Intelligence at Johns Hopkins University.
The first knowledge management officer at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, he also served as the Robert W. Deutsch Distinguished Professor of Information Systems at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County, professor of Management Science at George Washington University, and Chaired Professor of Artificial Intelligence (AI) at the U.S. Army War College. A founder and chairperson of The World Congress on Expert Systems, he is a Fulbright Scholar, IEEE-USA Federal Communications Commission Executive Fellow, and Computer Educator of the Year (International Association for Computer Information Systems).
Robert D. Austin
Jay Liebowitz
As baby boomers approach retirement age and the work patterns of younger workers constantly change, many organizations worldwide are experiencing a far-reaching knowledge bleed. Therefore, it is imperative that organizations find ways to best leverage and retain that vital knowledge before workers leave the organization and attrition occurs.

Answers the Call of Businesses Worldwide

In light of global workforce changes, many organizations’ are faced with a dilemma – how to maintain the right set of people at the right time in order to meet the company’s long-term goals and vision. Knowledge Retention: Strategies and Solutions supplies the answer in the form of strategic human capital management. Written by one of the most sought after knowledge management experts, this easy-to-read, concise guide helps companies adopt proven retention strategies and techniques to capture and share knowledge which is otherwise at risk of being lost in transition. The text also discusses key case studies by leading organizations applying knowledge retention strategies.

Build Institutional Memory and Social Networks

Addresses These Important Questions: How do you know what knowledge is important to capture? What is the best approach to developing a knowledge retention framework? How do you calculate the loss of knowledge? What are the appropriate steps once the damage is assessed? How do you identify knowledge flows and gaps in an organization?

Since you never know when someone will retire or move on, the book emphasizes the importance of minimizing business disruption and accelerating competency development. Operating around four key framework pillars – competency, performance, knowledge, and change management – this text demonstrates why a knowledge-retention strategy should be woven into an organization’s fabric from day one.

Efraim Turban
This new Edition of Electronic Commerce is a complete update of the leading graduate level/advanced undergraduate level textbook on the subject. Electronic commerce (EC) describes the manner in which transactions take place over electronic networks, mostly the Internet. It is the process of electronically buying and selling goods, services, and information. Certain EC applications, such as buying and selling stocks and airline tickets online, are reaching maturity, some even exceeding non-Internet trades. However, EC is not just about buying and selling; it also is about electronically communicating, collaborating, and discovering information. It is about e-learning, e-government, social networks, and much more. EC is having an impact on a significant portion of the world, affecting businesses, professions, trade, and of course, people.

The most important developments in EC since 2014 are the continuous phenomenal growth of social networks, especially Facebook , LinkedIn and Instagram, and the trend toward conducting EC with mobile devices. Other major developments are the expansion of EC globally, especially in China where you can find the world's largest EC company. Much attention is lately being given to smart commerce and the use of AI-based analytics and big data to enhance the field. Finally, some emerging EC business models are changing industries (e.g., the shared economy models of Uber and Airbnb). The 2018 (9th) edition, brings forth the latest trends in e-commerce, including smart commerce, social commerce, social collaboration, shared economy, innovations, and mobility.

Jay Liebowitz
This book shows healthcare professionals how to turn data points into meaningful knowledge upon which they can take effective action. Actionable intelligence can take many forms, from informing health policymakers on e?ective strategies for the population to providing direct and predictive insights on patients to healthcare providers so they can achieve positive outcomes. It can assist those performing clinical research where relevant statistical methods are applied to both identify the e?cacy of treatments and improve clinical trial design. It also benefits healthcare data standards groups through which pertinent data governance policies are implemented to ensure quality data are obtained, measured, and evaluated for the bene?t of all involved.

Although the obvious constant thread among all of these important healthcare use cases of actionable intelligence is the data at hand, such data in and of itself merely represents one element of the full structure of healthcare data analytics. This book examines the structure for turning data into actionable knowledge and discusses:

The importance of establishing research questions Data collection policies and data governance Principle-centered data analytics to transform data into information Understanding the "why" of classified causes and effects Narratives and visualizations to inform all interested parties

Actionable Intelligence in Healthcare

is an important examination of how proper healthcare-related questions should be formulated, how relevant data must be transformed to associated information, and how the processing of information relates to knowledge. It indicates to clinicians and researchers why this relative knowledge is meaningful and how best to apply such newfound understanding for the betterment of all.
Efraim Turban
Efraim Turban
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