Syd Arthur

Pearlsong Press
1
Free sample

Prince Siddhartha, raised behind palace walls and showered with every extravagance, abandoned his protected life to embark on a spiritual journey. He ultimately reached enlightenment and became known as the Buddha, which means "one who is awake." He then spent his life teaching that all have the potential to awaken...

Meet Syd Arthur! Living in the cloistered world of suburbia, Syd is a middle-aged Jewish woman who is potentially awake, but likes to start her day with a strong cup of coffee, just in case. Her daughter has just left for college and her diet is once again off track. While for most of her life she's been convinced that happiness can be attained by a magic number on the bathroom scale — or a really great shopping day at Bloomingdale's—she finds herself in the grocery store with an empty cart wondering if there just might be something more.

When East unexpectedly meets West, Syd embarks on a journey as a spiritual seeker. Soon she's in over her chakras as her search takes her from yoga studio to meditation hall to ashram gift store to the pages of Zensational catalogue. Her Mah Jongg group insists it's merely a midlife crisis. But nothing's going to stop Syd's journey toward Nirvana—not even the hottest sale at Nordstrom's. 

Follow Syd as she finds her bliss and discovers a richness that rivals a Godiva truffle, making for one delicious enlightenment.

"What do you wear to the meditation center?" I had asked Montana. "I mean, when I go to temple, I usually wear a suit. Sometimes a pantsuit, but mostly a skirt and a blazer."

"Okay, you definitely don't need to wear a suit, Syd. Just wear something comfortable to sit in. And I promise you Om Guru is not about the clothes. No one cares what you wear. People there are concerned about the inner you, about your journey to realize and meet the Self."

I thought for a minute and then said, "So let me ask you it this way. When I meet my Self, should I meet her in country club casual or something more dressy?"

Read more

About the author

Ellen Frankel is a licensed clinical social worker. In addition to the novel Syd Arthur, she is author of Beyond Measure: A Memoir About Short Stature and Inner Growth and co-author (with her sister Judith Matz, LCSW) of Beyond a Shadow of a Diet and The Diet Survivor's Handbook.
Read more
4.0
1 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Pearlsong Press
Read more
Published on
Apr 1, 2011
Read more
Pages
364
Read more
ISBN
9781597190275
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Fiction / Contemporary Women
Fiction / General
Fiction / Humorous
Fiction / Jewish
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
A touching, tender and at times funny account of a woman’s struggle for stature in a 4 foot 8½ inch tall body, Beyond Measure speaks to the heart of soul-breaking attempts to fit an arbitrary and elusive cultural ideal of physical perfection. Being short isn’t the problem, Ellen Frankel insists. Instead, the real difficulties lie in the social bias against short people.

Frankel shares the difficulties of living short in a world in which stereotypes are based on gender and size. She moves beyond her own experience into the political realm in revealing how pharmaceutical companies—with government backing—are expanding the market for human growth hormone treatment by reclassifying healthy short children as patients in “need” of such injections in hopes of making them taller.

She shares the dilemma of being subjected to simultaneous messages that her physical body should be bigger—that is, taller, but not wider—while her expansive spiritual body should be smaller. Self-destructive behaviors emerge from too much attention on the external rather than the internal workings of the soul. Frankel flirts with eating disorders and unhealthy relationships with powerful males in an attempt to compensate for her feelings of not “measuring up.” In the process, her real self slips farther away.

The path out of her dilemma lies in the shadow of the tallest mountain on Earth. It is through a spiritual pilgrimage to Nepal that Frankel discovers her own strength and spirit, and that we are all dwarfed by Everest and beyond measure.

"If you have ever measured your height or weight and felt good or bad about yourself as a result, you need this book," says Marilyn Wann, author of FAT!SO? Because You Don't Have to Apologize for Your Size. "In its pages, Ellen Frankel makes an important contribution to human liberation by telling the most fabulous story that can be told, the story of a person coming fully into her own. This book is thought-provoking, heart-rending, and a genuine solace for people of all sizes."

Animal experimentation has made a crucial contribution to many of the most important advances in modern medicine. The development of vaccines for deadly viruses like rabies and yellow fever depended upon animal research, and much of our basic knowledge about human health and physiology was discovered through the use of animals as well. Inspite of these gains, animal rights activists have been zealous in communicating to the public and policymakers their view that the use of animals in medical research is morally wrong and should be severely curtailed or eliminated. The activists' arguments draw upon a range of disciplines and focus on both practical and ethical aspects of animal experimentation.

Advocates of animal experimentation have been slow to respond to these arguments. Given that the worldwide toll of communicable diseases is still immense--and that deadly new pathogens may emerge at any time in the future to menace human health--failing to defend animal experimentation from the arguments of its opponents has disastrous implications. A quick response to an unanticipated threat on the order of the AIDS epidemic is unimaginable absent a vigorous research establishment, which in turn is dependent on animal proxies. Why Animal Experimentation Matters is a first attempt by research scientists and moral philosophers to mount a convincing defense against animal rights enthusiasts. Because opponents of animal experimentation come from a variety of intellectual backgrounds, this defense is necessarily interdisciplinary as well. In this collection of eight essays, the authors scrutinize how animal experimentation actually functions in the laboratory, the vital role that it plays in palliating and eradicating human and animal diseases, and the moral justification for sacrificing animals for the betterment of human life.

The subjects covered in the essays include the moral status of animals and persons, the importance of animals for advancing scientific knowledge, the history of animal experimentation (and of its detractors), differing theoretical approaches of American and European animal-experimentation regulations, the heavily restrictive legislation promoted by animal rights activists, and the threats posed to research and researchers by violent animal rights zealots. Contributors include Baruch Brody, H. Tristram Englehardt, Jr., R. G. Frey, Kenneth F. Kiple and Kriemhild Cone Ornelas, Adrian R. Morrison, Charles S. Nicoll and Sharon M. Russell, Jerrold Tannenbaum, and Stuart M. Zola. This important anthology will be of interest to scientists, philosophers, individuals suffering from heritable or communicable diseases, relatives of afflicted individuals, and policymakers.

Ellen Frankel Paul is deputy director of the Social Philosophy and Policy Center, professor of political science and philosophy at Bowling Green State University, and editor-in-chief of the journal Social Philosophy & Policy.

Fred D. Miller, Jr., and Jeffrey Paul are, respectively, the executive director and associate director of the Social Philosophy and Policy Center; both are professors of philosophy at Bowling Green State University.
In a country built on the institution of private property, property-owner rights have been under attack. By arguing that private property is a fundamental liberty whose protection deserves the highest priority, Ellen Frankel Paul challenges one of the dominant trends of the past half century: the erosion of property rights via zoning and land use restrictions, carried on by government exercising its "police power" or promoting "the public interest."

Paul begins by examining the arguments of environmentalists in support of land-use legislation, and explores a few particularly troubling examples of the exercise of eminent domain and police powers. She traces the philosophical arguments for the two powers as well as their tortuous judicial history, the meaning of property rights and investigates how previous thinkers have defended these rights is detailed, and Paul suggests a more adequate defense for them. In the concluding portion of the book, the very legitimacy of eminent domain is questioned and the author offers recommendations for its reform.

This analysis is wide in scope and makes creative use of historical, legal, economic, and philosophic methodologies. It not only gives an account of the present power regulations on land, but also provides an exhaustive history of the development of the law in these two areas and of the philosophical ideas of the thinkers who helped shape this process. This book is distinctive because it places a theory of the just acquisition of property at the heart of the answer to the question of the extent to which governments can rightfully exercise the powers of eminent domain and police.

"Amazingly, in a country built on the institution of private property, the right to property in land has been under increasing assault, and has seldom been defended. Paul's book--by arguing that private property is a fundamental liberty whose protection deserves the highest priority--is a major step toward filling the void."--Robert Hessen, Stanford University

Ellen Frankel Paul is Deputy Director of the Social Philosophy and Policy Center, and is professor of political science and philosophy at Bowling Green State University. She is also an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute.

©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.