Central Italy: The Marches and Abruzzo

Weeklong car trips in Italy

Book 21
Enrico Massetti Publishing
Free sample

It is a matter of fact: Italy possesses the most remarkable artistic and cultural heritage of the world. And this is not all: its culture is not just to be found in the great artistic cities, but is diffuse, "spread" throughout national territory as in no other country.

The proof? Le Marche. A region in which a rich and varied countryside with the Adriatic sea, its flat and sandy coast interrupted at intervals by rugged, rocky precipices. Also, the musical agricultural landscape of its gentle hills; the deep and mysterious caves; the protected areas of natural beauty is enriched with towns, villages, palaces, and religious buildings, all of them of significant architectural and artistic value.

This is the case with the cathedral of Ancona, the regional capital, and an essential Adriatic port, or the temple of Pesaro. In Urbino, the Ducal Palace is a stupefying testimony of Renaissance grandeur. If you find yourself in Macerata during the summer, it is unpardonable not to book a seat at the grand Sferisterio theatre for a play or musical performance. At Ascoli Piceno, the blend of medieval and renaissance architecture (S. Francesco, Loggia dei Mercanti, Piazza del Popolo, etc.) arrests the attention of even the most distracted visitor. But in almost all the centers of Le Marche, even the smallest, there are many genuine artistic treasures.

This guide leads you in a two weeks car trip through Central Italy, in the regions of The Marches, Umbria, and Abruzzo.
It covers the towns of Pesaro, Urbino, Gubbio, Perugia, Assisi, Spello, Foligno, Montefalco, Spoleto, Terni, Rieti, L'Aquila, Popoli, Rivisondoli, Roccaraso, Chieti, Pescara, Teramo, Ascoli Piceno, Macerata, Loreto and Ancona.
It includes many photos and descriptions of the attractions.
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About the author

Enrico Massetti was born in Milano. Now he lives in Washington DC, USA, but he regularly visit his hometown, and enjoys going around all the places in his home country.

Enrico can be reached at enricomassetti@msn.com

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Additional Information

Publisher
Enrico Massetti Publishing
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Published on
Nov 22, 2015
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Pages
63
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ISBN
9781329689671
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Language
English
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Genres
Travel / Europe / Italy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Tuscany is located in the central western part of Italy on the Tyrrhenian Sea. It gets its name from an Etruscan tribe that settled the area about three thousand years ago. It has belonged to the Romans, the Lombards, and the Franks.

More than four hundred years ago under the Medicis, Tuscany became a major European center. It is undoubtedly one of Italy's top tourist destinations as well as an ideal place for your villa when you hit it big, huge.

Florence is the birthplace of the Italian Renaissance and the administrative center of Tuscany. It is one of Italy’s top tourist destinations, whose sites of interest are too numerous to list here. Siena and Pisa are two other major tourist destinations.

Tuscany is a center of industrial production, in particular metallurgy, chemicals, and textiles. Given the region’s importance as an international art center for centuries, don’t be surprised that it is an excellent place to appreciate and purchase fashion, jewelry, leather goods, marble, and other items of beauty. Florence is the home of the house of Gucci.

Tuscany produces a wide variety of cereal, olives, vegetables, and fruit. But not only vegetarians eat well. It is home to cattle, horses, pigs, and poultry. One local specialty is the wild boar. On the coast, seafood is abundant.

Tuscany devotes over one hundred fifty thousand acres to grapevines, it ranks 4th among the 20 Italian regions. Its total annual wine production is about 58 million gallons, giving it the 8th place. About 70% of the wine production is red or rose', leaving 30% for white. The region produces 44 DOC wines. DOC stands for Denominazione di Origine Controllata, which may be translated as Denomination of Controlled Origin, presumably a high-quality wine and 7 DOCG white wine. The G in DOCG stands for Garantita, but there is, in fact, no guarantee that such wines are truly superior. The region produces 9 DOCG wines. Tuscany also produces Super Tuscan wines, wines that may not have a prestigious classification but that are known to be outstanding.

This guide covers a visit to Florence and to Tuscany: the cities covered include Fiesole, Arezzo, Cortona, Chiusi, the Chianti region, Siena, Volterra, San Gimignano, Pisa, Carrara, Massa, the Versilia, Lucca, Pistoia, Montepulciano, Pienza, Grosseto, Massa Marittima, and Monte Argentario.

There are extensive descriptions and photos of the attractions.

The guide contains links to the websites of train and air travel companies.

It also has a listing of many reviews for the best-recommended restaurants that are at walking distance from the location where lunch or dinner are planned.

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Valle d’Aosta is a vertical region, you might say, in the physical sense, for the many high peaks that surround it (including Mont Blanc, the highest mountain in Europe at 4,807 meters). But also for the surprising concentration, in a region of such reduced dimensions, of so many natural splendors, of so many monuments, of so much precious historic and artistic heritage, of a density which evokes, in its vertical aspect, the crowding of skyscrapers in a metropolis where horizontal urban space is scarce and precious.

Aosta, the regional capital and the only province of the Valley, is a city rich in history. Traces of the ancient Augusta Pretoria (the Latin name of Aosta) can easily be seen, such as the magnificent Arch of Augustus (25 B.C.) and the remains of the Roman Theatre.

For Aosta the Middle Ages were anything but dark: as an essential center of commercial traffic with France and Switzerland, the city enjoyed an extended period of prosperity. It is no coincidence that the Cathedral and Cathedral Church of S. Orso, two churches of great beauty, date back to the Middle Ages.

This guide covers visits to the mountain region of Aosta Valley, with the description of several itineraries to visit the valley.

The locations covered are the city of Aosta, the lower valley with its castles, a visit to Cogne and the Gran Paradiso Park, a visit to Morgex, La Thuille and the Piccolo San Bernardo Pass, one to Courmayeur, one to Valpelline and the Gran San Bernardo Pass, and all the villages of the Valtournance Valley.

There are extensive descriptions and photos of the attractions.

It has the listing of many reviews for the best-recommended restaurants for all the locations; you have the necessary information ready: the name, address and telephone number are included in the guide together with the review.

If you are planning to tour Europe, you should consider the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region of northeastern Italy, bordering on Austria and Slovenia. For simplicity's sake, we abbreviate the region's full name to Friuli. This lovely region may be an ideal vacation spot. You can get classic Italian food and other specialties, and wash it all down with excellent local wine. While Friuli is by no means undiscovered by tourists, you usually won't be fighting crowds to see what you want. Like most regions of Italy, it has belonged to many nations over the years. The area remains multicultural, an exceptional mixture of Italian, Austrian, and Slavic influences.

Trieste, with a population of about two hundred thousand, is the region's largest city. Trieste was definitely part and parcel of Mittel Europa (Central Europe) as the principal port of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Trieste only joined Italy in 1954. One can easily imagine that with such a unique history Trieste is quite a unique place to visit. It is.

As soon as you arrive in Trieste, you'll notice its ubiquitous coffee houses. Among the best known is the Antico Caffe San Marco. As befits its internationality, Trieste is home to a variety of historic religious buildings representing many faiths. The Serbian-Orthodox church of the Holy Trinity and Saint Spyridon, which was built in the mid-Nineteenth Century shows strong Byzantine influence. Go inside for a look at its beautiful frescoes and icons. The Israelite Temple of Trieste, just over a century old, is Italy's largest synagogue. The Trieste Cathedral dedicated to the city's patron saint, San Guisto (Saint Justus) who was martyred at the beginning of the Fourth Century, was initially built in the Sixth Century on Roman ruins. It is adjacent to a castle of the same name. Walk on its ramparts for an excellent view of the city and its surroundings. There is no shortage of other churches and museums to visit.

This is a guide to a trip in the Friuli region of Italy: passing through Grado, Lignano, Aquileia, Trieste, Pordenone, Udine, and touching the mountains of Friuli, the Carnia, Tarvisio, and Sequals.

There are extensive descriptions and photos of the attractions.

It contains many reviews for the best-recommended restaurants that are at the location described.

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Tuscany is located in the central western part of Italy on the Tyrrhenian Sea. It gets its name from an Etruscan tribe that settled the area about three thousand years ago. It has belonged to the Romans, the Lombards, and the Franks.

More than four hundred years ago under the Medicis, Tuscany became a major European center. It is undoubtedly one of Italy's top tourist destinations as well as an ideal place for your villa when you hit it big, huge.

Florence is the birthplace of the Italian Renaissance and the administrative center of Tuscany. It is one of Italy’s top tourist destinations, whose sites of interest are too numerous to list here. Siena and Pisa are two other major tourist destinations.

Tuscany is a center of industrial production, in particular metallurgy, chemicals, and textiles. Given the region’s importance as an international art center for centuries, don’t be surprised that it is an excellent place to appreciate and purchase fashion, jewelry, leather goods, marble, and other items of beauty. Florence is the home of the house of Gucci.

Tuscany produces a wide variety of cereal, olives, vegetables, and fruit. But not only vegetarians eat well. It is home to cattle, horses, pigs, and poultry. One local specialty is the wild boar. On the coast, seafood is abundant.

Tuscany devotes over one hundred fifty thousand acres to grapevines, it ranks 4th among the 20 Italian regions. Its total annual wine production is about 58 million gallons, giving it the 8th place. About 70% of the wine production is red or rose', leaving 30% for white. The region produces 44 DOC wines. DOC stands for Denominazione di Origine Controllata, which may be translated as Denomination of Controlled Origin, presumably a high-quality wine and 7 DOCG white wine. The G in DOCG stands for Garantita, but there is, in fact, no guarantee that such wines are truly superior. The region produces 9 DOCG wines. Tuscany also produces Super Tuscan wines, wines that may not have a prestigious classification but that are known to be outstanding.

This guide covers a visit to Florence and to Tuscany: the cities covered include Fiesole, Arezzo, Cortona, Chiusi, the Chianti region, Siena, Volterra, San Gimignano, Pisa, Carrara, Massa, the Versilia, Lucca, Pistoia, Montepulciano, Pienza, Grosseto, Massa Marittima, and Monte Argentario.

There are extensive descriptions and photos of the attractions.

The guide contains links to the websites of train and air travel companies.

It also has a listing of many reviews for the best-recommended restaurants that are at walking distance from the location where lunch or dinner are planned.

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At its most expansive, the Roman Empire stretched from the British Isles to Egypt; Rome was the ancient world's greatest superpower. Roman Architecture: A Visual Guide is an illustrated introduction to the great buildings and engineering marvels of Rome and its empire. Published as a companion volume to Diana E. E. Kleiner's course on Roman Architecture given through Coursera (first offered in January 2014 but based on a class she has long taught at Yale), this enhanced e-book explores not only Rome but also buildings preserved at Pompeii, Herculaneum, Ostia, Tivoli, North Italy, Sicily, France, Spain, Germany, Greece, Turkey, Croatia, Jordan, Lebanon, and North Africa. Beginning with the birth of Rome as an Iron Age village, Roman Architecture traces the growth and expansion of the Roman Empire through its cities, which featured civic, religious, commercial, entertainment, and residential districts in the urban setting. A valuable resource for both the student and the traveler, Roman Architecture features over 250 photographs and site plans of the most intriguing and consequential buildings in the Roman Empire. These are presented from the fresh perspective of an author who has journeyed to nearly all of the sites, revealing most of them through her own digital images. In addition, this interactive e-book makes learning about these monuments easier than ever, with handy maps and geolocation links that show you just where the monuments are and, if you're traveling, how to get there. Suitable for the classroom and as a guidebook, Roman Architecture is a fascinating introduction to some of history's most compelling and influential architecture.

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