Thomas Hare and Political Representation in Victorian Britain

Springer
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This book is a history of the emergence and development of the concept of proportional representation and its relation to political theory within the context of nineteenth-century British party politics focusing on Thomas Hare (1806-1891).
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About the author

F. D. PARSONS holds a PhD from the University of Cambridge where he studied under the late Dr Henry Pelling at St John's College. Since 1981 he has been a Professor of History at Franklin College Switzerland.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer
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Published on
Jul 30, 2009
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Pages
287
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ISBN
9780230244665
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / Great Britain / General
History / General
History / Modern / General
History / Social History
Political Science / History & Theory
Political Science / Political Ideologies / Democracy
Political Science / Political Process / Campaigns & Elections
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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