Reshaping Planning with Culture

Routledge
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Planning is described as being increasingly sidelined by the impacts of neo-liberal restructuring. At the same time, 'culture' is nowadays seen as the world's key intellectual resource possessing new creative weight in sociological, economic and environmental terms. This book argues that, in the light of this cultural turn, there is the opportunity to re-position planning and proposes an original, practical and robust system of 'culturisation'. Culturisation is defined as the ethical, critical and reflexive integration of culture into planning and potentially other areas such as public administration, corporate strategy and development thinking. Cultural theory, planning theory, global governance policy and recent, innovative culturised practices are all explored to this end. The new theoretical and practical approach put forward shows how deeper, richer and more relevant ideas about culture can be utilized in planning, and is illustrated with international examples and two major case studies detailing new vistas for a refurbished planning.
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About the author

Dr Greg Young, Research Fellow at the Centre for Cultural Research, University of Western Sydney, australia.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Apr 8, 2016
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Pages
236
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ISBN
9781317065401
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Public Policy / Regional Planning
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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