Taking Stock

Governance and Public Management

Book 2
McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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Distinguished scholars from six countries investigate the effects of reforms in a number of areas, including budgeting, personnel management, and accountability. While reforms have been beneficial in some of these areas, success has been far from universal. By comparing and contrasting measures in Canada, the United States, Britain, Australia, New Zealand, and Europe, contributors isolate and evaluate factors - such as individual political leaders and the complexity of government - that influence the success or failure of reforms.
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About the author

University of Pittsburgh, USA

Universite de Moncton, Canada

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Additional Information

Publisher
McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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Published on
Mar 24, 1998
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Pages
432
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ISBN
9780773567283
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Public Affairs & Administration
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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