Ticonderoga Soldierelijah Estabrooks Journal 1758-1760: A Massachusetts Provincial Soldier in the French and Indian War

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The French and Indian War (also known as the Seven Years' War), was fought between 1754 and 1763. One of the major battles in the North American campaign was fought at Fort Carillon, also known as Ticonderoga.

Fort Ticonderoga had been erected by the French in New York in 1755, on a site which they believed was the key to the defense of Canada. The fort was strategically situated to provide control of both the two-mile portage and navigation northward on Lake Champlain. General Montcalm was ordered to defend it, and the British were determined to take it by force. Although the British had the superior numbers, the battle went badly for them because their commander was killed in a small skirmish with the French before the battle began. On the 8th of July 1758, the French Forces under the leadership of General Montcalm defeated a superior British force led by General Abercrombie.

This is the story of Elijah Estabrooks, a Massachusetts provincial soldier who fought in that battle. Elijah kept a Journal throughout his military service, and the purpose of this book is to provide additional details on the people and places that he wrote about during this war.

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About the author

Major Harold A. Skaarup, CD2, BFA, MA in War Studies, is a Canadian Forces Army Intelligence Officer with an interest in Military History. He has served overseas with 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade in Germany, with the Canadian Contingent of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Nicosia, Cyprus (CANCONCYP), with the NATO-led Peace Stabilization Force in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina (SFOR), with North American Aerospace Defence Command (NORAD) and United Sates Northern Command in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and with the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), Kabul Multi-National Brigade (KMNB) in Kabul, Afghanistan. He currently lives in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada.

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Additional Information

Publisher
iUniverse
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Published on
Mar 12, 2001
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Pages
300
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ISBN
9781462047918
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / Revolutionary Period (1775-1800)
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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