Harvard Law Review: Volume 129, Number 7 - May 2016

Quid Pro Books
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The May 2016 issue, Number 7, features these contents: 

• Article, "The Positive Law Model of the Fourth Amendment," by William Baude and James Y. Stern  

• Essay, "Deference and Due Process," by Adrian Vermeule 

• Book Review, "How to Explain Things with Force," by Mark Greenberg 

• Note, "Free Speech Doctrine After Reed v. Town of Gilbert

Furthermore, student commentary analyzes Recent Cases on the Affordable Care Act and the origination clause; statutory interpretation and the Video Privacy Protection Act; and commercial speech doctrine and the FDA's power to prosecute non-misleading statements after modifying text. Other commentary examines South Carolina's legislative effort to to disqualify companies who support BDS from receiving state contracts; and the NLRB's adjudicative ruling to classify canvassers as employees, not independent contractors. Finally, the issue includes several brief comments on Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This is the seventh issue of academic year 2015-2016.

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About the author

Principal articles and essays are written by recognized legal scholars, and student editors contribute substantial research in the form of commentaries on recent cases, recent legislation, and recent publications. 

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Publisher
Quid Pro Books
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Published on
May 10, 2016
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Pages
233
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ISBN
9781610278027
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Administrative Law & Regulatory Practice
Law / Antitrust
Law / Criminal Procedure
Law / Jurisprudence
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Contents of Harvard Law Review: Volume 130, Number 8 - June 2017 include:

* Article, "The Judicial Presumption of Police Expertise," by Anna Lvovsky  

* Essay, "The Debate That Never Was," by Nicos Stavropoulos  

* Essay, "Hart's Posthumous Reply," by Ronald Dworkin 

* Book Review, "Cooperative and Uncooperative Foreign Affairs Federalism," by Jean Galbraith  

* Note, "Rethinking Actual Causation in Tort Law"  

* Note, "The Justiciability of Servicemember Suits" 

* Note, "The Substantive Waiver Doctrine in Employment Arbitration Law" 

Furthermore, student commentary analyzes Recent Cases on: requiring proof of administrative feasibility to satisfy class action Rule 23; whether prison gerrymandering violates the Equal Protection Clause; justiciability of suit against the government for military sexual assaults; whether criminal procedure requires retroactive application of Hurst v. Florida to pre-Ring cases; whether statutory interpretation's rule of lenity requires fixing cocaine possession penalties by total drug weight; and, in international law, the UN's Security Council asserting Israel's settlement activities to be illegal. Finally, the issue includes several summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2300 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This is the final issue of academic year 2016-2017.

The November issue of the Harvard Law Review is the special annual review of the U.S. Supreme Court's previous Term. Each year, the issue is introduced by noteworthy and extensive contributions from recognized scholars. In this issue, for the 2014 Term, articles include: 

• Foreword: “Does the Constitution Mean What It Says?," by David A. Strauss  

• Comment: “Imperfect Statutes, Imperfect Courts: Understanding Congress’s Plan in the Era of Unorthodox Lawmaking,” by Abbe R. Gluck 

• Comment: “Zivotofsky II as Precedent in the Executive Branch,” by Jack Goldsmith  

• Comment: “A New Birth of Freedom?: Obergefell v. Hodges,” by Kenji Yoshino  

In addition, the first issue of each new volume provides an extensive summary of the important cases of the previous Supreme Court docket, covering a wide range of legal, political, and constitutional subjects. Student commentary on Leading Cases of the 2014 Term includes recent cases on: private rights of action and Medicaid; government speech under the First Amendment; judicial campaign speech; Fourth Amendment standing; reasonable mistakes of law for searches and seizure; regulatory takings under the Fifth Amendment; preliminary injunctions in death penalty cases; separation of powers in bankruptcy jurisdiction; legislative control of redistricting; racial gerrymandering under the Fourteenth Amendment; dormant commerce clause and personal income tax; changing interpretive rules in administrative law; residual clause of the Armed Career Criminal Act; cost-benefit analysis under the Clean Air Act; mens rea for violating federal threats law; disparate impact and racial equality in fair housing law; nondelegation doctrine in the context of railroad-passenger law; religious liberty and land use; Sherman Act state action immunity; and destruction of evidence under Sarbanes-Oxley. 

Complete statistical graphs and tables of the Court's actions and results during the Term are included; these summaries and statistics, including voting patterns of individual justices, have been considered very useful to scholars of the Court in law and political science. The issue includes a linked Table of Cases and citations for the opinions. Finally, the issue features two summaries of Recent Publications.

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. This current issue of the Review is November 2015, the first issue of academic year 2015-2016 (Volume 129).

They thought they were safe.  They were wrong.

The murder of a young prostitute and a baby found abandoned on the same winter night signals the start of a disturbing investigation for Detective Kim Stone – one which brings her face to face with someone from her own horrific childhood.

As three more sex workers in the Black Country are murdered in quick succession, each death more violent than the last, Kim and her team realise that the initial killing was no one-off frenzied attack, but a twisted serial killer preying on the vulnerable.

At the same time, the search begins for the desperate woman who left her newborn baby at the station – but what at first looks like a tragic abandonment soon takes an even more sinister turn.

When another young woman goes missing, the two investigations bring the team into a terrifying, hidden world, and a showdown puts Kim’s life at risk as secrets from her own past come to light. 

As Kim battles her own demons, can she stop the killer, before another life is lost?                   

A gripping new crime thriller from the number 1 bestseller – you will be hooked until the final jaw-dropping twist.

                          

Praise for Broken Bones:

‘Angela Marsons has yet again nailed and delivered an outstanding five star read. Broken Bones had me hook, line and sinker until the shocking end. The author certainly knows how to keep me on my toes until delivering a final punch that knocked me well and truly off my feet. Brilliant!’ By the letter Book Reviews

‘Captivating…Angela Marsons yet again drags you into the story and locks you in until the final word. I can honestly say this is my favourite book of the best British Crime Series I think I've ever read! If I could give it 6 stars I would.’ Goodreads reviewer

‘Angela’s books touch on real storylines, and the ones here are both timely, hard-hitting and make for some emotional reading…Once again this is another faultless book from Angela Marsons who I firmly believe is in a league of her own in this genre.’ Book Addict Shaun

‘With an opening that will have you gripped from start to finish, I devoured it in a matter of hours - I simply couldn't put it down… I was literally on the edge of my seat with anticipation wanting to know what was going to happen next.’ Chelle’s Book Reviews

‘Marsons for me is the QUEEN of this genre. She knows how to add the human touch to each story and I just adore her. Bloody FABULOUS.’ Postcard Reviews

‘Angela Marsons is one of the most immensely talented writers out there; she has an exceptional skill in creating a cast of characters and a spider web of plots that will keep you glued to the book until it is finished. I'd strongly advise getting yourself well comfy before you start reading this as you are not going to move until you are done!’ Goodreads reviewer

‘An action-packed page turner with many twists and turns in a plot that is brilliantly written…This is a clever, realistic storyline that sucks you from the very first pages. I would have no hesitation in recommending this series to anyone, the quality of the writing never disappoints. Love it!’ Goodreads reviewer

‘Marsons just gets better and better, her plots are slick, her writing intelligent, and her characters are like family… It's a sign of a phenomenal author to be able to create that connection between reader and character, and Marsons just has it… I cannot praise her writing enough. Broken Bones is utterly amazing. Buy it. Now.’  Emma the Little Book Worm

‘The suspense builds up so fast and I couldn’t wait to get to the end for everything to be revealed… this definitely my favourite book of the series so far!’ Stardust Book reviews

‘Simply brilliant. Firstly, the plot is amazingly good and keeps you hooked from the first page. I really didn’t see the ending coming and really really enjoyed this read…I read it in one day and feel bereft now I’ve finished it.’ Goodreads reviewer

‘Angela Marsons is the only author that I put other books down for, to read hers when they come out. Did it live up to my expectations? Hell Yes!’ Nigel Adams Bookworm

‘Angela Marsons never fails, each one is as good, if not better than the last. I feel like I’m part of the team, totally immersed in the story. Keep it up, I can’t wait for the next one!’ Goodreads reviewer

‘A terrific plot with a real shockeroo of an ending…As always, the pace is fast as lightning, and the short chapters with their mini-cliffhanger endings make it so hard to put the book down… I will read anything and everything written by this author. If you have not started reading this series, you are really missing out.’ Goodreads reviewer

‘Stunningly good are the words that spring to mind after finishing the book. It's dark, it's twisted and I couldn't put it down. I loved it...So when is the next one out? I'm ready!’ Bonnie’s Book Talk

‘Oh my word, she's done it again!!! I was on the edge of my seat reading this book, I loved how each chapter took you in a different direction to the last and often ended in a cliff hanger that made you want to continue to find out what happened next!’ The Introverted Mum

‘The storyline had loads of twists and turns…a real page turner. I couldn’t put it down…I would give this book ten stars if I could.’ Goodreads reviewer

‘Kim Stone is without a doubt my favourite detective series and as soon as I get the latest book it immediately goes to the top of my reading list.’ Goodreads reviewer

‘Angela Marsons can't write a boring chapter if she tried. Her Kim Stone series is one of the best. I had it all worked out...until I realized that I knew nothing. I can't wait for the next one.’ Goodreads reviewer

                                                                                                      

Praise for Angela Marsons D.I. Kim Stone series:  

‘Hooked from the very first page...This is the best book I’ve read, by the best author on the shelves...I really can’t wait for the next one.’ Nigel Adams Book Worm (5 stars)

‘I could not put it down and was hooked in from page one to the very last word ... The plot is stunning. Very clever and very dark…A fantastic crime novel from one of my all-time favourite writers ever.’ Booklover Catlady (5 stars)

‘Gripping. I was captivated from the start, there is just no let-up...I wanted to read at every opportunity, fast-paced and blood pressure raising!...Angie Marsons is definitely one of my favourite authors, I just think the books are fantastic.’ Stef Loz Book Reviews (5 stars)

‘I read it in one gripping sitting as I just couldn't tear myself away...The Kim Stone series is one of the best crime series ever written...an incredibly powerful read, one that drew real emotion from me…There can't be a crime fan left in the world who hasn't discovered this series yet but if there is and you are one of them, go and read them all immediately.’ Book Addict Shaun (5 stars)

‘Read this book now, it is just that amazing...a gripping, unpredictable story...I couldn’t have been more hooked if I tried...some of the most vivid writing I've read, and I was feeling slightly queasy as I was reading as a result...unpredictable and completely absorbing.’ Rachel’s Random Reads (5 stars)             

‘Brilliant...a terrifying, nail-biting finale where, once again, Kim proves how far she will go to protect her team. Ms. Stone is fast becoming one of the greats of detective fiction’ Go Buy the Book (5 stars)

‘Addictive...yet ANOTHER cracker to add to an already stunning series. This stomping great read from an exceedingly talented writer will have you furiously flipping the pages.’ Little Bookness Lane (5 stars)

‘My favourite read of the year so far...Wow, totally fantastic, beautifully written, dark, dangerous and emotional. This series gets better with each book, loved it. I give it 6 stars.’ Bonnie’s Book Talk (5 stars)

‘Gripping...the best book in the series yet, and that takes some doing... grips you by the throat and doesn't let you go to the last heart-pumpingchapter...Would I recommend this book? Hell yes.’ The Book Review Café (5 stars)

‘One of the only people to make me cry [Angela Marsons] also takes me right to the edge of my very last nerve. Both from excitement and tension. Every. Flipping. Time. This is not a story for the faint-hearted...Best. One. Ever... (so far ;) ) Dark, troubled and tension-filled 5 stars. Big fat ones. Like, massive.’ Jen Med Book Reviews (5 stars)

‘Terrifying...I was genuinely surprised at the twist!...I stayed up late to finish this book and at the satisfying end, there was the same old question I know all DI Kim Stone fans have . . . when is the next one out??’ K.L. Slater

The November issue is the special annual review of the U.S. Supreme Court's previous Term. Each year, the issue is introduced by noteworthy and extensive contributions from recognized scholars. In this issue, for the 2012 Term, articles and essays include:

• Foreword: "Equality Divided," by Reva B. Siegel
• Comment: "Beyond the Discrimination Model on Voting," by Samuel Issacharoff 
• Comment: "Windsor and Brown: Marriage Equality and Racial Equality," by Michael J. Klarman  
• Comment: "License, Registration, Cheek Swab: DNA Testing and the Divided Court," by Erin Murphy 

The issue also features essays on substantive and procedural law, and judicial method, honoring Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and her 20 years on the Court. The essays are written by such scholars as Deborah Anker, Susan Farbstein, Judge Nancy Gertner, Lani Guinier, Vicki Jackson, Richard Lazarus, John Manning, Martha Minow, Carol Steiker, Julie Suk, Laurence Tribe, and Mark Tushnet. 

In addition, the first issue of each new volume provides an extensive summary of the important cases of the previous Supreme Court docket, covering a wide range of legal, political and constitutional subjects. Student commentary on Leading Cases of the 2012 Term includes recent cases on: federal preemption regarding elections; the Privileges and Immunities Clause; unconstitutional conditions violating free speech; effective assistance of counsel; dog-sniffing at the doorstep under the Fourth Amendment; jury trial right for mandatory sentencing; affirmative action in public universities; class action certification in securities cases; class action waivers in arbitration clauses; plain error review when new law is made after appeal; standing in government surveillance challenges; extraterritoriality under the Alien Tort Statute; actual innocence under AEDPA; deference to agencies in clean water and communication act cases; the First Sale Doctrine in copyright law; patent exhaustion; patentable subject matter; reverse payment settlements; Indian adoptions; and employer liability for supervisor harassment under Title VII. Complete statistical graphs and tables of the Court's actions and results during the Term are included. Finally, the issue features several summaries of Recent Publications.

The Harvard Law Review's March 2017 issue, Number 5, features these contents: 

• Article, "On the Relevance of Market Power," by Louis Kaplow 

• Book Review, "Spiraling: Evictions and Other Causes and Consequences of Housing Instability," by Vicki Been and Leila Bozorg (reviewing Matthew Desmond's Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City) 

• Note, "Rights in Flux: Nonconsequentialism, Consequentialism, and the Judicial Role" 

• Note, "The Misguided Appeal of a Minimally Adequate Education" 
Furthermore, student commentary analyzes Recent Cases on: separation of powers and the appointments clause; personal jurisdiction in anti-terrorism act cases arising on foreign soil; deference to agency interpretations in conflict with circuit precedent; judicial review of zoning in light of DC's comprehensive plan; use of algorithmic risk assessments in sentencing; whether mother's debt for juvenile-detention costs of minor is dischargeable in bankruptcy; and whether ERISA preempt Michigan's Medicaid tax law. Finally, the issue includes two summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This is the fifth issue of academic year 2016-2017.

The contents for the February 2018 issue (Number 4) include: 

• Article, “Are We Running out of Trademarks? An Empirical Study of Trademark Depletion and Congestion,” by Barton Beebe & Jeanne C. Fromer 

• Article, “Agency Fees and the First Amendment,” by Benjamin I. Sachs  

• Book Review, “Unsettling History,” by Jennifer M. Chacón 

• Note, “Bail Reform and Risk Assessment: The Cautionary Tale of Federal Sentencing” 

In addition, the issue includes several commentaries on Recent Cases, analyzing such subjects as: political rights and nonapportionment in Puerto Rico; asserting conspiracy-of-silence claim when prevented from witnessing a search; constitutionality of routine shackling in pretrial proceedings; sovereign immunity as applied to Ethiopia in hacking suit; harms-of-abatement doctrine and due process; and whether aggregate term-of-years sentences implicate Eighth Amendment restrictions on juvenile life without parole. Finally the issue features several summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. This current issue of the Review is February 2018, the 4th issue of academic year 2017-2018 (Volume 131). The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions.

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