PISA, Power, and Policy: the emergence of global educational governance

Symposium Books Ltd
Free sample

Over the past ten years the PISA assessment has risen to strategic prominence in the international education policy discourse. Sponsored, organized and administered by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), PISA seems well on its way to being institutionalized as the main engine in the global accountability regime.

The goal of this book is to problematize this development and PISA as an institution-building force in global education. It scrutinizes the role of PISA in the emerging regime of global educational governance and questions the presumption that the quality of a nation’s school system can be evaluated through a standardized assessment that is insensitive to the world’s vast cultural and institutional diversity. The book raises the question of whether PISA’s dominance in the global educational discourse runs the risk of engendering an unprecedented process of worldwide educational standardization for the sake of hitching schools more tightly to the bandwagon of economic efficiency, while sacrificing their role to prepare students for independent thinking and civic participation. 

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Publisher
Symposium Books Ltd
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Published on
May 13, 2013
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Pages
336
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ISBN
9781873927960
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / General
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This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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This book grew out of the experience of a European Union Thematic Network of the same title, and focuses on aspects of the complex and varying relationships between globalisation, Europeanisation and Education.

The volume is divided into two parts:

PART 1: Governance and the Knowledge Economy, focuses on how the discourses of a Knowledge Economy and Lifelong Learning, and an emerging functional and scalar division of the labour of educational governance became central to the development of a European Education Space. Contributors emphasise the role of the European Commission, and especially the Lisbon agenda, in this process, and considers the role of the Open Method of Coordination and the Bologna Process in the construction of the EES. A key theme linking Europeanisation to globalisation is the prominence of the discourse of competitiveness, and the role allocated to education in enhancing Europe’s ability to compete with the United States and Japan.

PART TWO: Citizenship, Identity and Language, looks at the emergence of a new social model for Europe, this time from the point of view of how it relates the development of individual capacities and citizenship, and the role of intellectuals in this process. A second major theme is the place, role and choice of languages and at the impact of pressures from globalisation and Europeanisation, and national and sub-national levels, on language choice and teaching, taking into account both ‘World Englishes’ and Language Europe. Finally, globalisation becomes the central issue in an analysis of its different relationships with ‘northern’ (of which European education policy is taken as the example) and ‘southern’ paradigms of educational development. 

The governance of education in many countries and regions of the world is currently in transition, challenging histories, remaking subjectivities and shaping possible futures. This book provides an up to date analysis and discussion of the cutting edge theme of educational governance from an international comparative perspective. The volume explores the landscape of educational governance in its broadest sense; considering new forms of steering, leadership and management, assessment and evaluation, teaching and learning, knowledge creation and the realities and possibilities for different forms of political engagement. The new spatial dynamics of education are explored in institutional settings such as schools and universities and via professional groupings such as teachers, administrators and leaders. The chapters in this book are based on the best peer reviewed papers and keynote speeches, which were delivered at the XXVI Conference of the Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) in June 2014 in Freiburg, Germany. Comparative Education is uniquely situated to explore the emerging dynamics of educational governance within changing and newly emerging educational spaces because it provides the opportunity to learn more about different local, national or regional educational processes and trajectories and to share knowledge about the logics, ideologies and impacts of different techniques and regimes of governance across Europe and beyond. Hans-Georg Kotthoff is Professor of Comparative Education and School Pedagogy at the University of Education Freiburg, Germany, and President of the Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) since 2012. Eleftherios Klerides is Lecturer in Comparative Education and History of Education at the University of Cyprus and the Secretary-Treasurer of the Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE).
“In the face of much handwringing over higher education in America today, this eclectic set of essays offers an engaging call to sustain core values like civic education, the liberal arts, intellectual community and not pandering to fake science, even as a hugely different population with very different needs and desires fills college classrooms.”

—Karen Arenson, Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow and former New York Times reporter and editor

“What Is College For? makes a powerful, compelling case for the civic purpose of higher education and provides sensible strategies for renewing and strengthening that purpose. At a time when education for profit often undermines education for the public good, Lagemann and Lewis have made a much-needed contribution to our understanding, as well as our ability to work effectively to fulfill the democratic mission of America’s colleges and universities.”

—Ira Harkavy, Associate Vice President and Director, Netter Center for Community Partnerships, University of Pennsylvania


At a time when higher education attendance has never felt more mandatory for career success and economic growth, the distinguished contributors to this provocative collection ask readers to consider the civic mission of higher education as equally vital to the nation’s well-being. Should higher education serve a greater public interest? In what ways should colleges and universities be asked to participate in public controversies? What should we expect institutions of higher education to contribute to the development of honesty and ethical judgment in the civic sphere? What should colleges do to foster greater intellectual curiosity and aesthetic appreciation in their students and communities, and why is this important for all Americans?


Contributors: Paul Attewell, Elaine Tuttle Hansen, David E. Lavin, Catharine R. Stimpson, William M. Sullivan, and Douglas Taylor.


Ellen Condliffe Lagemann is the Levy Institute Research Professor at Bard College, a senior scholar at the Levy Economics Institute, and a senior fellow at the Bard Prison Initiative. Harry Lewis is Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences of Harvard University.

Focusing on comparative examination of educational reforms, this book explores the relation of state practices and educational knowledge to changes in culture and economics among nations. Countries with different state traditions and political regimes are studied to understand how national and global settings are interrelated in current restructuring of education and social welfare policies related to schooling. The regional cases focus on the policies of the European Union, restructuring efforts in Latin America, and family, child welfare, and early childhood policies in Eastern Europe. In addition, specific studies of national changes in Argentina, Great Britain, Germany, Russia, Tanzania, South Africa, and the U.S. are presented.

Educational Knowledge makes a unique contribution by bringing neo-Marxist theories, world systems, and post-modern cultural and political theories into a conversation about the changes that are occurring in the educational arena. This book will interest not only specialists in the field of education studying educational reform, but also economists, political scientists, sociologists, and comparative historians who examine the functioning of education within the larger context of modernization.

Contributors include Benita Blessing, Marianne Bloch, Alejandra Brgin, Gunilla Dahlberg, Peter Drewek, Ines Dussel, Tony Edwards, Sharon Gewirtz, Lisa Hennon, Steve Kerr, Johan Müller, Antonio Novoa, Thomas S. Popkewitz, Jurgen Schriewer, Gillermiona Tiramonti, Carlos Alberto Torres, Frances Vavrus, and Geoff Whitty.
The study of common and diverse effects in the field of education across Europe is a growing field of inquiry and research. It is the result of many actions, networks and programmes over the last few decades and the development of common European education policies. Europeanizing Education describes the origins of European education policy, as it metamorphosed from cultural policy to networking support and into a space of comparison and data. The authors look at the early development and growth of research networks and agencies, and international and national collaborations. The gradual increase in the velocity and scope of education policy, practice and instruments across Europe is at the heart of the book.

The European space of education, a new policy space, has been slowly coaxed into existence; governed softly and by persuasion; developed by experts and agents; and de-politicized by the use of standards and data. It has increasing momentum. It is becoming a single, commensurable space on a rising tide of indicators and benchmarks. The construction of policy spaces by the European Union makes Europe governable: policy spaces have to be mobilized by networks of actors and constructed by comparative data. They are the result of transnational flows of people, ideas and practices across European borders; the direct effects of European Union policy; and, finally, the Europeanizing effect of international institutions and globalization.

The European space of education and research has become a new place of work through interconnected institutions, networks and companies, and it is being constructed through the flow of policy ideas, knowledge and practices from place to place, sector to sector, organization to organization, and across borders. This book will be useful to any scholar of the new arena of study, the European Space of Education. 

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