Journal, ed. by B. Torrey, 1837-1846, 1850-Nov. 3, 1861

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Additional Information

Publisher
Houghton, Mifflin
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Published on
Dec 31, 1906
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Pages
546
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Best For
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Language
English
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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This carefully crafted ebook: “Walden + Civil Disobedience + Slavery in Massachusetts” contains 3 books in one volume and is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Walden is a book written by Henry David Thoreau. The work is part personal declaration of independence, social experiment, voyage of spiritual discovery, satire, and manual for self-reliance. First published in 1854, it details Thoreau's experiences over the course of two years, two months, and two days in a cabin he built near Walden Pond, amidst woodland near Concord, Massachusetts. The book compresses the time into a single calendar year and uses passages of four seasons to symbolize human development. Civil Disobedience (Resistance to Civil Government) is an essay that was first published in 1849. In it, Thoreau argues that individuals should not permit governments to overrule or atrophy their consciences, and that they have a duty to avoid allowing such acquiescence to enable the government to make them the agents of injustice. Thoreau was motivated in part by his disgust with slavery and the Mexican–American War. Slavery in Massachusetts" is an 1854 essay based on a speech he gave at an anti-slavery rally at Framingham, Massachusetts, on July 4, 1854, after the re-enslavement in Boston, Massachusetts of fugitive slave Anthony Burns. Henry David Thoreau (1817 – 1862) was an American author, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, historian and leading transcendentalist. He is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay Resistance to Civil Government (also known as Civil Disobedience), an argument for disobedience to an unjust state.
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