Bringing Geography to Book

Tauris Historical Geography

Book 4
I.B.Tauris
Free sample

The publication of Ellen Semple’s 'Influences of Geographic Environment' in 1911 - a treatise on what would later be called environmental determinism - coincided with the emergence of geography as an independent academic discipline in North America and Britain. A controversial text written by one of America’s first female professional geographers, it exerted an important but varied influence on generations of geographers. Some considered it a monument to Semple’s scholarship and erudition - a timely manifesto for a scientific approach to human geography. For others, it was conceptually flawed. Accepted by some, repudiated by others, 'Influences' was lauded and criticized in almost equal measure. Innes M. Keighren examines the different reactions to Semple’s book. He explains why 'Influences' was encountered differently by different people, at different times and in different places, and reveals why the book aroused the passions it did. Attending to archival records, personal correspondence, published reviews, provenance and marginalia, the author traces a geography of the book’s reception and outlines the contribution geography can make to understanding the way knowledge and ideas, in the guise of the printed text, are conceived, transmitted and received. The result is a pioneering work that provides a wholesale re-visioning of the way in which geographical knowledge is disseminated.
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About the author

Innes M. Keighren was until recently Research Associate at the Institute of Geography and the Centre for the History of the Book at the University of Edinburgh. He is now Lecturer in Human Geography at Royal Holloway, University of London.

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Additional Information

Publisher
I.B.Tauris
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Published on
Aug 31, 2010
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Pages
272
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ISBN
9780857718471
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / Great Britain / General
History / Historical Geography
History / North America
Science / Earth Sciences / Geography
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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On the 2 March 1899 the British flag was hoisted on the Antarctic continent. The event - recorded in the first ever photograph taken on Antarctica - claimed possession on behalf of the British crown. A century later, 14,000 feet beneath the North Pole, a mini-submarine attached to a nuclear-powered ice breaker affixed the Russian flag to the Arctic seabed, and 213 miles above the Earth a Chinese astronaut waved the flag of the People’s Republic. For many the dawn of the twentieth century ushered in what Joseph Conrad called ‘Geography Triumphant’, an era where the world map had few if any blank spaces left to discover and the figure of the lone explorer motivated by a noble quest for knowledge and adventure was banished for ever. The age of exploration was supposedly dead. New Spaces of Exploration challenges this assumption. Focussing specifically on exploration in the twentieth century the authors demonstrate how new technologies and changing geopolitical configurations have ensured that exploration has remained a key feature of our rapidly globalizing world. New Spaces of Exploration brings together scholars from a wide range of backgrounds - including historical, political, and cultural geography, history of science, cultural studies, art and cartography - to explore the spaces and politics of exploration over the past hundred years. Ranging widely in their geographical focus - from Europe and Asia to Australia, and from the polar regions to outer space - they demonstrate the increasing diversity of modern exploration and reveal the continuing political, military, industrial and cultural motivations at play. The result is a major contribution to our understanding of the significance of exploration in the twentieth century. Contributors: E. Baigent, C. Collis, K. Dodds, F. Driver, M. Godwin, J. Hill, F. Korsmo, F. MacDonald, S. Naylor, J. Ryan, N. Thomas, K. Yusoff.
On the 2 March 1899 the British flag was hoisted on the Antarctic continent. The event - recorded in the first ever photograph taken on Antarctica - claimed possession on behalf of the British crown. A century later, 14,000 feet beneath the North Pole, a mini-submarine attached to a nuclear-powered ice breaker affixed the Russian flag to the Arctic seabed, and 213 miles above the Earth a Chinese astronaut waved the flag of the People’s Republic. For many the dawn of the twentieth century ushered in what Joseph Conrad called ‘Geography Triumphant’, an era where the world map had few if any blank spaces left to discover and the figure of the lone explorer motivated by a noble quest for knowledge and adventure was banished for ever. The age of exploration was supposedly dead. New Spaces of Exploration challenges this assumption. Focussing specifically on exploration in the twentieth century the authors demonstrate how new technologies and changing geopolitical configurations have ensured that exploration has remained a key feature of our rapidly globalizing world. New Spaces of Exploration brings together scholars from a wide range of backgrounds - including historical, political, and cultural geography, history of science, cultural studies, art and cartography - to explore the spaces and politics of exploration over the past hundred years. Ranging widely in their geographical focus - from Europe and Asia to Australia, and from the polar regions to outer space - they demonstrate the increasing diversity of modern exploration and reveal the continuing political, military, industrial and cultural motivations at play. The result is a major contribution to our understanding of the significance of exploration in the twentieth century. Contributors: E. Baigent, C. Collis, K. Dodds, F. Driver, M. Godwin, J. Hill, F. Korsmo, F. MacDonald, S. Naylor, J. Ryan, N. Thomas, K. Yusoff.
New York Times bestselling author Hampton Sides returns with a white-knuckle tale of polar exploration and survival in the Gilded Age

In the late nineteenth century, people were obsessed by one of the last unmapped areas of the globe: the North Pole. No one knew what existed beyond the fortress of ice rimming the northern oceans, although theories abounded. The foremost cartographer in the world, a German named August Petermann, believed that warm currents sustained a verdant island at the top of the world. National glory would fall to whoever could plant his flag upon its shores.

James Gordon Bennett, the eccentric and stupendously wealthy owner of The New York Herald, had recently captured the world's attention by dispatching Stanley to Africa to find Dr. Livingstone. Now he was keen to re-create that sensation on an even more epic scale. So he funded an official U.S. naval expedition to reach the Pole, choosing as its captain a young officer named George Washington De Long, who had gained fame for a rescue operation off the coast of Greenland. De Long led a team of 32 men deep into uncharted Arctic waters, carrying the aspirations of a young country burning to become a world power. On July 8, 1879, the USS Jeannette set sail from San Francisco to cheering crowds in the grip of "Arctic Fever."

The ship sailed into uncharted seas, but soon was trapped in pack ice. Two years into the harrowing voyage, the hull was breached. Amid the rush of water and the shrieks of breaking wooden boards, the crew abandoned the ship. Less than an hour later, the Jeannette sank to the bottom,and the men found themselves marooned a thousand miles north of Siberia with only the barest supplies. Thus began their long march across the endless ice—a frozen hell in the most lonesome corner of the world. Facing everything from snow blindness and polar bears to ferocious storms and frosty labyrinths, the expedition battled madness and starvation as they desperately strove for survival.

With twists and turns worthy of a thriller, In The Kingdom of Ice is a spellbinding tale of heroism and determination in the most unforgiving territory on Earth.

Ebook edition includes over a dozen extra images
In this provocative, startling book, Robert D. Kaplan, the bestselling author of Monsoon and Balkan Ghosts, offers a revelatory new prism through which to view global upheavals and to understand what lies ahead for continents and countries around the world.
 
In The Revenge of Geography, Kaplan builds on the insights, discoveries, and theories of great geographers and geopolitical thinkers of the near and distant past to look back at critical pivots in history and then to look forward at the evolving global scene. Kaplan traces the history of the world’s hot spots by examining their climates, topographies, and proximities to other embattled lands. The Russian steppe’s pitiless climate and limited vegetation bred hard and cruel men bent on destruction, for example, while Nazi geopoliticians distorted geopolitics entirely, calculating that space on the globe used by the British Empire and the Soviet Union could be swallowed by a greater German homeland.
 
Kaplan then applies the lessons learned to the present crises in Europe, Russia, China, the Indian subcontinent, Turkey, Iran, and the Arab Middle East. The result is a holistic interpretation of the next cycle of conflict throughout Eurasia. Remarkably, the future can be understood in the context of temperature, land allotment, and other physical certainties: China, able to feed only 23 percent of its people from land that is only 7 percent arable, has sought energy, minerals, and metals from such brutal regimes as Burma, Iran, and Zimbabwe, putting it in moral conflict with the United States. Afghanistan’s porous borders will keep it the principal invasion route into India, and a vital rear base for Pakistan, India’s main enemy. Iran will exploit the advantage of being the only country that straddles both energy-producing areas of the Persian Gulf and the Caspian Sea. Finally, Kaplan posits that the United States might rue engaging in far-flung conflicts with Iraq and Afghanistan rather than tending to its direct neighbor Mexico, which is on the verge of becoming a semifailed state due to drug cartel carnage.
 
A brilliant rebuttal to thinkers who suggest that globalism will trump geography, this indispensable work shows how timeless truths and natural facts can help prevent this century’s looming cataclysms.

Praise for The Revenge of Geography
 
“[An] ambitious and challenging new book . . . [The Revenge of Geography] displays a formidable grasp of contemporary world politics and serves as a powerful reminder that it has been the planet’s geophysical configurations, as much as the flow of competing religions and ideologies, that have shaped human conflicts, past and present.”—Malise Ruthven, The New York Review of Books
 
“Robert D. Kaplan, the world-traveling reporter and intellectual whose fourteen books constitute a bedrock of penetrating exposition and analysis on the post-Cold War world . . . strips away much of the cant that suffuses public discourse these days on global developments and gets to a fundamental reality: that geography remains today, as it has been throughout history, one of the most powerful drivers of world events.”—The National Interest
 
“Kaplan plunges into a planetary review that is often thrilling in its sheer scale . . . encyclopedic.”—The New Yorker
 
“[The Revenge of Geography] serves the facts straight up. . . . Kaplan’s realism and willingness to face hard facts make The Revenge of Geography a valuable antidote to the feel-good manifestoes that often masquerade as strategic thought.”—The Daily Beast


From the Hardcover edition.
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