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 The Digital Puritan is a quarterly digest of carefully selected Puritan works which provides a steady diet of sound Puritan teaching. The language has been gently modernised to render it more readable, while still retaining much of the flavour and character of the original text. Hundreds of helpful notes and Scripture references (in the English Standard Version®) are included as end-notes; no internet connection is needed.

The following articles appear in this summer 2014 edition:

1. Self-Denial – in which Isaac Ambrose expounds Mark 8:34, showing that self-denial must be a cardinal feature of Christ’s true disciples.

2. The Almost Christian – George Whitefield shows from Acts 26:28 that having the trappings of religion is not the same thing as having true saving faith.

3. God’s Regard for His Own Glory, Seen in the Saving of Sinners – in which Stephen Charnock illustrates the rich glory of God as can only be seen in his redemption of sinful men.

4. Charity, in Respect of Other Men’s Sins – John Howe teaches from 1 Corinthians 13:6 that believers should never rejoice over the failings or misfortunes of others, and should be predisposed to grant them the benefit of the doubt.

5. A Word to the Aged – comforting and insightful teaching from William Bridge for those who have nearly run their course.

The Puritans in Verse: A Psalm of Praise – Richard Baxter.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Digital Puritan Press
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Pages
170
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ISBN
9781312385986
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Language
English
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Genres
Religion / Christian Church / History
Religion / Christian Life / Devotional
Religion / Christian Life / Spiritual Growth
Religion / Christian Theology / History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Historians typically single out the hundred-year period from about 1050 to 1150 as the pivotal moment in the history of the Latin Church, for it was then that the Gregorian Reform movement established the ecclesiastical structure that would ensure Rome’s dominance throughout the Middle Ages and beyond. In Before the Gregorian Reform John Howe challenges this familiar narrative by examining earlier, "pre-Gregorian" reform efforts within the Church. He finds that they were more extensive and widespread than previously thought and that they actually established a foundation for the subsequent Gregorian Reform movement.

The low point in the history of Christendom came in the late ninth and early tenth centuries—a period when much of Europe was overwhelmed by barbarian raids and widespread civil disorder, which left the Church in a state of disarray. As Howe shows, however, the destruction gave rise to creativity. Aristocrats and churchmen rebuilt churches and constructed new ones, competing against each other so that church building, like castle building, acquired its own momentum. Patrons strove to improve ecclesiastical furnishings, liturgy, and spirituality. Schools were constructed to staff the new churches. Moreover, Howe shows that these reform efforts paralleled broader economic, social, and cultural trends in Western Europe including the revival of long-distance trade, the rise of technology, and the emergence of feudal lordship. The result was that by the mid-eleventh century a wealthy, unified, better-organized, better-educated, more spiritually sensitive Latin Church was assuming a leading place in the broader Christian world.

Before the Gregorian Reform challenges us to rethink the history of the Church and its place in the broader narrative of European history. Compellingly written and generously illustrated, it is a book for all medievalists as well as general readers interested in the Middle Ages and Church history.

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“Riveting . . . Aslan synthesizes Scripture and scholarship to create an original account.”—The New Yorker
 
“Fascinatingly and convincingly drawn . . . Aslan may come as close as one can to respecting those who revere Jesus as the peace-loving, turn-the-other-cheek, true son of God depicted in modern Christianity, even as he knocks down that image.”—The Seattle Times
 
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“Compulsively readable . . . This superb work is highly recommended.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)
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