Brewing Science, Technology and Print, 1700-1880

University of Pittsburgh Press
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How did the brewing of beer become a scientific process? Sumner explores this question by charting the theory and practice of the trade in Britain and Ireland during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

From an oral culture derived from home-based skills, brewing industrialized rapidly and developed an extensive trade literature, based increasingly on the authority of chemical experiment. The role of taxation is also examined, and the emergence of brewing as a profession is set within its social and technical context.
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About the author

James Sumner is senior lecturer in the history of technology at the University of Manchester.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Pittsburgh Press
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Published on
Aug 15, 2013
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Pages
320
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ISBN
9780822981664
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / General
Science / History
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This content is DRM protected.
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