Operation World: The Definitive Prayer Guide to Every Nation, Edition 7

InterVarsity Press
33
Free sample

Operation World, the definitive global prayer handbook, has been used by more than a million Christians to pray for the nations. Now in its 7th edition, it has been completely updated and revised by Jason Mandryk with a team of missionaries and researchers, and it covers the entire populated world. Included in this updated and revised 7th edition:
  • All the countries of the world featured
  • Maps of each country
  • Geographic information
  • People groups within each country
  • Economic information
  • Political information
  • Religious make-up of each country
  • Daily Prayer Calendar
  • Answers to prayer
  • Challenges for prayer
Whether you are an intercessor praying behind the scenes for world change, a missionary abroad or simply curious about the world, Operation World will give you the information necessary to play a vital role in fulfilling the Great Commission. Note: Because this ebook is richly illustrated, please allow a little extra time to download after purchase.
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About the author

A master's graduate in global Christian studies from Providence College and Theological Seminary in Canada, Jason Mandryk sensed that God was putting in him a more global calling to see the big picture, to analyze the trends and to communicate the global challenge to the church. Jason coauthored the sixth edition of Operation World, released in 2001, with Patrick Johnstone. A regular speaker at mission events, Jason specializes in mission mobilizing, focusing on the biblical basis for mission and weighing strategic considerations for mission today and in the future.

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Additional Information

Publisher
InterVarsity Press
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Published on
Nov 15, 2010
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Pages
3841
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ISBN
9780830895991
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Language
English
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Genres
Religion / Christian Life / Prayer
Religion / Christian Ministry / Missions
Social Science / Sociology of Religion
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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