Stop Putting Out Fires: Building a More Efficient and Profitable Law Practice

Scarlet Oak Press
This book will become available on May 2, 2019. You will not be charged until it is released.

Have happier clients. Get better results. Make more money.You can have a more profitable and productive law practice by being a better manager of your clients, cases, and practice. When we are disorganized, we waste time and resources. Stop Putting Out Fires will give you ideas to have a more efficient practice, more effective relationships with your clients, and a more systematic approach for managing your caseload. If you want to be more productive, capture more of your billable time, and learn from the hard-earned lessons of others, Stop Putting Out Fires is a resource to aid you in that journey.

At its core, Stop Putting Out Fires is about three things:
1. You having happier clients by better understanding your clients’ needs and establishing better relationships.
2. You getting better results through more effective case management and better litigation strategies.
3. You making more money, not by working more hours, but by working more efficiently, having set goals, and having a healthier practice.
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About the author

 Jeremy is a civil defense lawyer in Birmingham. He writes on his ABA-acclaimed law blog (www.jeremywrichter.com) about both practice specific and law practice management topics. Jeremy aims to help his readers improve their crafts through more efficient practice systems and effective communication. Jeremy is the author of Building a Better Law Practice and Stop Putting Out Fires.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Scarlet Oak Press
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Published on
May 2, 2019
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Pages
203
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ISBN
9781733665513
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Law Office Management
Law / Legal Education
Law / Legal Profession
Law / Legal Services
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Lawyers today are in a moral crisis. The popular perception of the lawyer, both within the legal community and beyond, is no longer the Abe Lincoln of American mythology, but is often a greedy, cynical manipulator of access and power. In The Lawyer's Myth, Walter Bennett goes beyond the caricatures to explore the deeper causes of why lawyers are losing their profession and what it will take to bring it back.

Bennett draws on his experience as a lawyer, judge, and law teacher, as well as upon oral histories of lawyers and judges, in his exploration of how and why the legal profession has lost its ennobling mythology. Effectively using examples from history, philosophy, psychology, mythology, and literature, Bennett shows that the loss of professionalism is more than merely the emergence of win-at-all-cost strategies and a scramble for personal wealth. It is something more profound—a loss of professional community and soul. Bennett identifies the old heroic myths of American lawyers and shows how they informed the values of professionalism through the middle of the last century. He shows why, in our more diverse society, those myths are inadequate guides for today's lawyers. And he also discusses the profession's agony over its trickster image and demonstrates how that archetype is not only a psychological reality, but a necessary component of a vibrant professional mythology for lawyers.

At the heart of Bennett's eloquently written book is a call to reinvigorate the legal professional community. To do this, lawyers must revive their creative capacities and develop a meaningful, professional mythology—one based on a deeper understanding of professionalism and a broader, more compassionate ideal of justice.
Every lawyer wants to be a good lawyer. They want to do right by their clients, contribute to the professional community, become good colleagues, interact effectively with people of all persuasions, and choose the right cases. All of these skills and behaviors are important, but they spring from hard-to-identify foundational qualities necessary for good lawyering. After focusing for three years on getting high grades and sharpening analytical skills, far too many lawyers leave law school without a real sense of what it takes to be a good lawyer. In The Good Lawyer, Douglas O. Linder and Nancy Levit combine evidence from the latest social science research with numerous engaging accounts of top-notch attorneys at work to explain just what makes a good lawyer. They outline and analyze several crucial qualities: courage, empathy, integrity, diligence, realism, a strong sense of justice, clarity of purpose, and an ability to transcend emotionalism. Many qualities require apportionment in the right measure, and achieving the right balance is difficult. Lawyers need to know when to empathize and also when to detach; courage without an appreciation of consequences becomes recklessness; working too hard leads to exhaustion and mistakes. And what do you do in tricky situations, where the urge to deceive is high? How can you maintain focus through a mind-taxing (or mind-numbing) project? Every lawyer faces these problems at some point, but if properly recognized and approached, they can be overcome. It's not easy being good, but this engaging guide will serve as a handbook for any lawyer trying not only to figure out how to become a better--and, almost always, more fulfilled--lawyer.
In What Millennial Lawyers Want: A Bridge from the Past to the Future of Law Practice, author Susan Smith Blakely expands her audience beyond young women lawyers to ALL young lawyers and those who lead them. Following the success of her three-book Best Friends at that Bar series, Ms. Blakely shifts her focus to millennial lawyers who are the future of the law profession.

This book is for:

Law students to understand current practices, what needs to be changed, and how to fit into an evolving profession; Law firm associates to validate their instincts about outdated law firm policies and toxic law firm cultures; and Law firm leaders to understand millennial lawyers and to make the necessary changes to law firm cultures to retain talent and lead them into the next quarter of the 21st century.

Through extensive research about millennial lawyers and by millennial lawyers as well as entertaining and inspirational stories of lawyers from a generation past, Blakely makes a case that demonstrates a healthier path forward for a profession in transition—a path enriched by recapture of the values and beliefs, which successfully guided lawyers of the Greatest Generation. The message is that bad habits and toxic environments are not beyond repair if we listen to the voices of a new generation of lawyers and help them—and us—find a better way forward.

You will learn:

The facts about millennial lawyers; The values that millennial lawyers bring to the profession; What millennial lawyers want from law practice; The challenge for law firms to initiate change to retain and develop millennial lawyers; and Lessons from real life stories demonstrating values lost but not forgotten.
Winner of the 2017 Eduardo Bonilla-Silva Outstanding Book Award, sponsored by the Society for the Study of Social Problems.

Finalist for the C. Wright Mills Book Award, sponsored by the Society for the Study of Social Problems.

Winner of the 2017 Oliver Cromwell Cox Book Award, sponsored by the American Sociological Association's Section on Racial and Ethnic Minorities.

Winner of the 2017 Mary Douglas Prize for Best Book, sponsored by the American Sociological Association's Sociology of Culture Section.

Honorable Mention in the 2017 Book Award from the American Sociological Association's Section on Race, Class, and Gender.

NAACP Image Award Nominee for an Outstanding Literary Work from a debut author.

Winner of the 2017 Prose Award for Excellence in Social Sciences and the 2017 Prose Category Award for Law and Legal Studies, sponsored by the Professional and Scholarly Publishing Division, Association of American Publishers.

Silver Medal from the Independent Publisher Book Awards (Current Events/Social Issues category).

Americans are slowly waking up to the dire effects of racial profiling, police brutality, and mass incarceration, especially in disadvantaged neighborhoods and communities of color. The criminal courts are the crucial gateway between police action on the street and the processing of primarily black and Latino defendants into jails and prisons. And yet the courts, often portrayed as sacred, impartial institutions, have remained shrouded in secrecy, with the majority of Americans kept in the dark about how they function internally. Crook County bursts open the courthouse doors and enters the hallways, courtrooms, judges' chambers, and attorneys' offices to reveal a world of punishment determined by race, not offense.

Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve spent ten years working in and investigating the largest criminal courthouse in the country, Chicago–Cook County, and based on over 1,000 hours of observation, she takes readers inside our so-called halls of justice to witness the types of everyday racial abuses that fester within the courts, often in plain sight. We watch white courtroom professionals classify and deliberate on the fates of mostly black and Latino defendants while racial abuse and due process violations are encouraged and even seen as justified. Judges fall asleep on the bench. Prosecutors hang out like frat boys in the judges' chambers while the fates of defendants hang in the balance. Public defenders make choices about which defendants they will try to "save" and which they will sacrifice. Sheriff's officers cruelly mock and abuse defendants' family members.

Crook County's powerful and at times devastating narratives reveal startling truths about a legal culture steeped in racial abuse. Defendants find themselves thrust into a pernicious legal world where courtroom actors live and breathe racism while simultaneously committing themselves to a colorblind ideal. Gonzalez Van Cleve urges all citizens to take a closer look at the way we do justice in America and to hold our arbiters of justice accountable to the highest standards of equality.

Delve deeper into Crook County with related media and instructor resources.

Professors Fischl and Paul explain law school exams in ways no one
has before, all with an eye toward improving the reader’s performance.
The book begins by describing the difference between educational
cultures that praise students for “right answers,” and the law school
culture that rewards nuanced analysis of ambiguous situations in which
more than one approach may be correct. Enormous care is devoted to
explaining precisely how and why legal analysis frequently produces such
perplexing situations.


But the authors don’t stop with mere description. Instead, Getting to Maybe
teaches how to excel on law school exams by showing the reader how
legal analysis can be brought to bear on examination problems. The book
contains hints on studying and preparation that go well beyond
conventional advice. The authors also illustrate how to argue both sides
of a legal issue without appearing wishy-washy or indecisive. Above
all, the book explains why exam questions may generate feelings of
uncertainty or doubt about correct legal outcomes and how the student
can turn these feelings to his or her advantage.


In sum, although the authors believe that no exam guide can
substitute for a firm grasp of substantive material, readers who devote
the necessary time to learning the law will find this book an invaluable
guide to translating learning into better exam performance.


“This book should revolutionize the ordeal of studying for
law school exams… Its clear, insightful, fun to read, and right on the
money.” — Duncan Kennedy, Carter Professor of General Jurisprudence, Harvard Law School  “Finally
a study aid that takes legal theory seriously… Students who master
these lessons will surely write better exams. More importantly, they
will also learn to be better lawyers.” — Steven L. Winter, Brooklyn Law School “If
you can't spot a 'fork in the law' or a 'fork in the facts' in an exam
hypothetical, get this book. If you don’t know how to play 'Czar of the
Universe' on law school exams (or why), get this book. And if you do
want to learn how to think like a lawyer—a good one—get this book. It's,
quite simply, stone cold brilliant.” — Pierre Schlag, University of Colorado School of Law (Law Preview Book Review on The Princeton Review website)

Attend a Getting to Maybe seminar! Click here for more information.

One L, Scott Turow's journal of his first year at law school introduces and a best-seller when it was first published in 1977, has gone on to become a virtual bible for prospective law students. Not only does it introduce with remarkable clarity the ideas and issues that are the stuff of legal education; it brings alive the anxiety and competiveness--with others and, even more, with oneself--that set the tone in this crucible of character building. Turow's multidimensional delving into his protagonists' psyches and his marvelous gift for suspense prefigure the achievements of his celebrated first novel, Presumed Innocent, one of the best-selling and most talked about books of 1987.

Each September, a new crop of students enter Harvard Law School to begin an intense, often grueling, sometimes harrowing year of introduction to the law. Turow's group of One Ls are fresh, bright, ambitious, and more than a little daunting. Even more impressive are the faculty: Perini, the dazzling, combative professor of contracts, who presents himself as the students' antagonist in their struggle to master his subject; Zechman, the reserved professor of torts who seems so indecisive the students fear he cannot teach; and Nicky Morris, a young, appealing man who stressed the humanistic aspects of law.

Will the One Ls survive? Will they excel? Will they make the Law Review, the outward and visible sign of success in this ultra-conservative microcosm? With remarkable insight into both his fellows and himself, Turow leads us through the ups and downs, the small triumphs and tragedies of the year, in an absorbing and throught-provoking narrative that teaches the reader not only about law school and the law but about the human beings who make them what they are.

In the new afterword for this edition of One L, the author looks back on law school from the perspective of ten years' work as a lawyer and offers some suggestions for reforming legal education.

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