Sicily's Interior: Enna, Caltanisetta, Caltagirone and Beyond

Hunter Publishing, Inc
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"A great new resource." --Travel + Leisure. "The perfect companion for planning." --Rutgers Magazine. "These useful travel guides are highly recommended." --Library Journal. There aren't many places in the world you can ski and then hit the beach afterwards for a refreshing dip; see Greek, Roman, Etruscan, medieval and Arabic architecture all in the same town; and meet some of the friendliest people in the world. The richness in culture is demonstrated in the theater, cinema and art found everywhere. The Mafia, the wines and foods, the astonishing history - all are explored in this guidebook. Full color throughout. This is excerpted from our full guide to Sicily. This guide focuses on Sicily's interior - the provinces of Enna, Caltanisetta and Caltagirone, encompassing the vast central part of Sicily. If you want to see more traditional Sicilian life, this is where you should come. The mountainous interior has great beauty and remains substantially underdeveloped compared to the coast. The archaeological ruins, amazing cities and some of Sicily's best festivals make it well worth seeing. Among the highlights: The castles of Cerami, Troina and Cesaro; A walking itinerary past Sperlinga's troglodytic houses; Sant'Angelo Muxaro - Trek, bike or horseback ride around the hilltop town to ancient tombs, drop into caves and enjoy the traditional foods and festivals; Corleone+- Famous for its Mafia associations; Villa Romana del Casale - The ancient mosaics at the villa outside Piazza Armerina; Explore the woods of Ficuzza on foot, bike or horseback; See the ancient ruins of Morgantina.
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Publisher
Hunter Publishing, Inc
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Published on
Feb 6, 2011
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Pages
268
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ISBN
9781556500565
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Language
English
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Genres
Travel / Europe / Italy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Available on Android devices
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These seven delightful islands lie off the north coast of Milazzo between Italy and Sicily. Each is different, featuring steaming volcanoes, luxurious mud baths to wallow in, crystal-clear waters full of fish and caves to explore, beaches to relax on, pleasant island walks and some serious trekking to reach the volcanic craters. However, they also share the same great weather in summer, fertile soils, beautiful blue waters, wonderful vistas and waves of day-trippers and vacationers. Don't be under any illusion - these islands have been discovered, but if you come on either side of July and August the weather is still fine and the crowds have either just left or are yet to arrive. The farther out you go on the islands too, the more you'll escape the summer hordes. Here are a few highlights! Take a sulphorous mud bath on Vulcano. Climb Stromboli's volcano at night amid the steaming vents. Hang out with the bearded locals at the remote hamlet of Ginostra. Join the elite, well-heeled crowd on elegant Panarea. Taste Malvasia wine at Salina. Explore prehistoric sites on Filicudi. A great new resource. --Travel + Leisure. "The perfect companion for planning." --Rutgers Magazine.  "These useful travel guides are highly recommended." --Library Journal. There aren't many places in the world you can ski and then hit the beach afterwards for a refreshing dip; see Greek, Roman, Etruscan, medieval and Arabic architecture all in the same town; and meet some of the friendliest people in the world. The richness in culture is demonstrated in the theater, cinema and art found everywhere. The coastal towns, the Mafia, the wines and foods, the astonishing history - all are explored in this guidebook. Full color throughout. This is excerpted from our full guide to Sicily as a whole.
From the Mediterranean to the Alps, from fine art to fine pasta: with Rick Steves on your side, Italy can be yours!

Inside Rick Steves Italy 2018 you'll find:

Comprehensive coverage for planning a multi-week trip to Italy
Rick's strategic advice on how to get the most out of your time and money, with rankings of his must-see favorites
Top sights and hidden gems, from the Colosseum and Michelangelo's David to corner trattorias and that perfect scoop of gelato
How to connect with local culture: Savor a delicious plate of cacio e pepe, discover the relaxed rhythms of sunny Cinque Terre, or chat with fans about the latest soccer match (calico, to locals)
Beat the crowds, skip the lines, and avoid tourist traps with Rick's candid, humorous insight
The best places to eat, sleep, and experience la dolce far niente
Self-guided walking tours of lively neighborhoods and museums
Vital trip-planning tools, like how to link destinations, build your itinerary, and get from place to place
Detailed maps, including a fold-out map for exploring on the go
Useful resources including a packing list, Italian phrasebook, a historical overview, and recommended reading
Over 1,000 bible-thin pages include everything worth seeing without weighing you down
Annually updated information on Venice, Padua, The Dolomites, Lake Country, Milan, Italian Riviera, Florence, Pisa, Lucca, Hill Towns of Central Italy, Siena, Tuscany, Rome, Naples, Pompeii, Capri, the Amalfi Coast, and much more

Make the most of every day and every dollar with Rick Steves Italy 2018.

Planning a one- to two-week trip? Check out Rick Steves Best of Italy. Spending a week or less in a city? Try Rick Steves Pocket Guides to Florence, Rome, Venice, and the Cinque Terre.

At its most expansive, the Roman Empire stretched from the British Isles to Egypt; Rome was the ancient world's greatest superpower. Roman Architecture: A Visual Guide is an illustrated introduction to the great buildings and engineering marvels of Rome and its empire. Published as a companion volume to Diana E. E. Kleiner's course on Roman Architecture given through Coursera (first offered in January 2014 but based on a class she has long taught at Yale), this enhanced e-book explores not only Rome but also buildings preserved at Pompeii, Herculaneum, Ostia, Tivoli, North Italy, Sicily, France, Spain, Germany, Greece, Turkey, Croatia, Jordan, Lebanon, and North Africa. Beginning with the birth of Rome as an Iron Age village, Roman Architecture traces the growth and expansion of the Roman Empire through its cities, which featured civic, religious, commercial, entertainment, and residential districts in the urban setting. A valuable resource for both the student and the traveler, Roman Architecture features over 250 photographs and site plans of the most intriguing and consequential buildings in the Roman Empire. These are presented from the fresh perspective of an author who has journeyed to nearly all of the sites, revealing most of them through her own digital images. In addition, this interactive e-book makes learning about these monuments easier than ever, with handy maps and geolocation links that show you just where the monuments are and, if you're traveling, how to get there. Suitable for the classroom and as a guidebook, Roman Architecture is a fascinating introduction to some of history's most compelling and influential architecture.

The southeastern corner of Sicily is a popular choice with travelers. Its historic towns, beautiful scenery and uncrowded beaches merit a substantial part of any Sicilian itinerary. Two glorious epochs in history have helped make the southeast towns what they are today. The Greeks settled the region and it flourished for 500 years under them as a center of culture, learning and political power. The second epoch was made possible by a devastating earthquake that flattened towns and villages in 1693. As a result, it was rebuilt in the ornate architectural style known as Sicilian Baroque. Siracusa is the major city in the region and the most visited, but there are plenty of other gems to discover in the wider province. Noto, Modica and Ragusa all feature the Baroque style; you could undertake some serious trekking at Pantalica's necropolis or Cava Grande in regions of immense beauty, bird watching at Vendicarri or explore Sicily's most southern point around Portopalo. Highlights: Ortigia: This beautiful warren of streets combines ancient Greece and Baroque with a view of the sea from almost every lane. Piazza del Duomo: This is one of Sicily's great squares and the Duomo its best church and a prime example of Siracusa's polyglot character. Take a dip in Cava Grande's waterfalls and refreshing pools. Pantalica's 5,000 tombs riddling the hillsides. The beautiful wetlands of Riserva di Vendicari. A great new resource. --Travel + Leisure. "The perfect companion for planning." --Rutgers Magazine. "These useful travel guides are highly recommended." --Library Journal. There aren't many places in the world you can ski and then hit the beach afterwards for a refreshing dip; see Greek, Roman, Etruscan, medieval and Arabic architecture all in the same town; and meet some of the friendliest people in the world. The richness in culture is demonstrated in the theater, cinema and art found everywhere. The coastal towns, the Mafia, the wines and foods, the astonishing history - all are explored in this guidebook. Full color throughout. This is excerpted from our full guide to Sicily.
These seven delightful islands lie off the north coast of Milazzo between Italy and Sicily. Each is different, featuring steaming volcanoes, luxurious mud baths to wallow in, crystal-clear waters full of fish and caves to explore, beaches to relax on, pleasant island walks and some serious trekking to reach the volcanic craters. However, they also share the same great weather in summer, fertile soils, beautiful blue waters, wonderful vistas and waves of day-trippers and vacationers. Don't be under any illusion - these islands have been discovered, but if you come on either side of July and August the weather is still fine and the crowds have either just left or are yet to arrive. The farther out you go on the islands too, the more you'll escape the summer hordes. Here are a few highlights! Take a sulphorous mud bath on Vulcano. Climb Stromboli's volcano at night amid the steaming vents. Hang out with the bearded locals at the remote hamlet of Ginostra. Join the elite, well-heeled crowd on elegant Panarea. Taste Malvasia wine at Salina. Explore prehistoric sites on Filicudi. A great new resource. --Travel + Leisure. "The perfect companion for planning." --Rutgers Magazine.  "These useful travel guides are highly recommended." --Library Journal. There aren't many places in the world you can ski and then hit the beach afterwards for a refreshing dip; see Greek, Roman, Etruscan, medieval and Arabic architecture all in the same town; and meet some of the friendliest people in the world. The richness in culture is demonstrated in the theater, cinema and art found everywhere. The coastal towns, the Mafia, the wines and foods, the astonishing history - all are explored in this guidebook. Full color throughout. This is excerpted from our full guide to Sicily as a whole.
This is a guide to all aspects of Palermo and its surroundings: where to stay and eat, what to see and do, how to get around. The island of Sicily is like another world compared to the rest of Italy - only three km away over the Messina Straits. And in fact the people proclaim themselves Sicilians first, with distinct differences in language, culture, food and day-to-day living. Many visitors find this surprising but refreshing. The richness in culture is seen in the architecture, theater, cinema and art found everywhere. Despite the poverty, unemployment and much-publicized Mafia control, it's a vibrant and volatile place but far safer than tourists expect.Sicilians have a strong sense of community, the pace of life is slow, schedules seem to have no importance and it can be simultaneously frustrating, entertaining and totally memorable. But, whether you come here to fish, dive, hike, ski, play golf or trace your family origins, there is plenty that is appealing to visitors. The capital of Sicily is immediately enticing despite its frenetic traffic and heady markets. It's an exciting, in-your-face and up-your-nose kind of city that's brash, fast and loveable - one of those places that is both loathed and loved in almost the same heartbeat. Jamie Oliver accurately described it as "modern-day anarchy" when he toured in 2005 writing and filming Jamie's Italy (BBC). There is crumbling architectural wealth, the diversity of multi-ethnic communities, an energetic population, tantalizing markets and wonderful coastlines, with the island of Ustica lying just off the coast. You can also retreat to the heights of Monte Pellegrino to the north or to the fine beach of Mondello. Palermo Highlights: Monreale - The ceiling of the church at Monreale in the heights above the city is a stunning example of medieval workmanship, with some of the most important of Christian mosaics in the world. Vucciria Market - The heady delights of Palermo are best experienced on foot in this bustling age-old market. Let your feet do the walking past stalls selling everything from film, batteries and electrical cord to mouth-watering delicacies like sun-dried tomatoes, eggplant and home-made pasta. Mondello - The pleasant beachfront, with fine seafood dining on ceramic plates, is a good excursion from the capital. Monte Pellegrino - Escape from the hustle and bustle of Palermo into the pleasant park area to the sanctuary on top. Bus it or walk to stretch your legs. Ustica - The turtle-shaped island off the coast is a pleasant day-escape from the busy capital. Its sparkling clear waters are perfect for scuba-diving. Monte Iato - This small mountain 30 km west of Palermo is a rocky slope littered with the remains of ancient cities in one of the region's most beautiful areas.
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