Crossing the Event Horizon: Human Metamorphosis and the Singularity Archetype

Jonathan Zap
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Crossing the Event Horizon provides evidence that we are, both individually and collectively, hurtling toward an evolutionary event horizon. Using the tools of Jungian psychology, the nature of the singularity is defined by its myriad manifestations emerging from the collective unconscious. These include dreams, motifs and themes found in art, science fiction and fantasy literature and films, religious cults, and the paranormal, especially near-death experiences and UFO encounters. Key aspects of the Singularity Archetype include: "Logos Beheld" (visually comprehended linguistic intent often associated with a collective telepathic network), Homo gestalt (a new species where individuality is conserved but also telepathically networked), and a parallelism between the individual event horizon of death and eschaton (the collective event horizon of the species). Apocalypticism is analyzed as an example of the Singularity Archetype pathologizing. A study of the Heaven's Gate saucer/suicide cult illustrates what can happen when people become possessed by the Singularity Archetype and are driven by it into delusory projections. The Singularity Archetype is viewed apocalyptically by the ego, and as a transcendent evolutionary event by the Self, and the duality of these views is explored in many examples. The evolutionary origins of the ego and its metamorphosis as it approaches the event horizon are explored. Evolutionary theory, which relates to the Singularity Archetype through a number of dynamic paradoxes, is discussed. Many popular books and movies are analyzed as permutations of the Singularity Archetype, including: Avatar, Childhood's End, Village of the Damned, Powder, and 2001: A Space Odyssey.The Singularity Archetype is a primordial image of human evolutionary metamorphosis which emerges from the collective unconscious. How the Archetype Manifests (a Composite Picture)A rupture-of-plane event occurs, usually threatening the survival of the individual and/or species.The event is a shock that disrupts the equilibrium of body/physical world and also individual/collective psyche. It is an ontological shock that will be viewed as the worst thing possible by individual/ collective ego. There is another rupture of plane that may actually be the same rupture as above but seen from a cosmic rather than a personal view. The shock is revealed to be a transcendent evolutionary event. The revelation of the transcendent aspect will often involve spiral motifs and unusual lights. Consciousness and communication metamorphose and with them core aspects---ego, individuality, connection to linear time, corporeality, gender identification, social order, etc.---fundamentally transform. There is a vision or actualization of release from some or all limits of corporeal incarnation and the emergence of "glorified bodies," which have enhanced powers and various degrees of etherialization. More visual and telepathic modes of consciousness and communication emerge, and this is part of a transformation of individuality into "Homo gestalt"---a new species where individual psyches are networked telepathically. The Singularity Archetype may be experienced and even actualized to various degrees by an individual through transcendent and/or anomalous experiences such as near-death experiences (NDEs), UFO/abduction/close encounter experiences, kundalini and psychotropic episodes.As with encounters with all archetypes, individuals and groups attach idiosyncratic material to it, such as particular end dates and scenarios. Another way of defining the Singularity Archetype (in its collective form) is as a resonance, flowing backward through time, of an approaching Singularity at the end of human history. The Singularity Archetype relates to both the evolutionary event horizon of the species and, for the individual, the event horizon of death.
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About the author

Jonathan Zap grew up in the Bronx and attended the Bronx High School of Science. He graduated from Ursinus College with honors in Philosophy and English and received his Masters degree in English from NYU.Jonathan is a photographer, author, teacher, paranormal researcher and philosopher who has written extensively on psychology and contemporary mythology. Jonathan has worked as a staff gemologist and instructor for the Gemological Institute of America. He has taught English in High School and College and worked with troubled youth as the Dean of a South Bronx High School. As a wilderness guide, Jonathan has led inner city kids and other young people on expeditions to remote desert canyons and to the summit of Mount Rainer.Jonathan is the author of numerous published articles, essays, experimental works of fiction and the Zap Oracle.Jonathan has done numerous radio and television interviews including four three hour shows on Coast to Coast AM---North America's most listened to late night talk show. Reality Sandwich, the popular online magazine, has published numerous of his articles.Jonathan has an extensive background in Jungian psychology, paranormal research and dream interpretation. For over thirty years he has been using the tools of Jungian psychology to study popular culture, contemporary mythology, and dreams for evidence that we are getting signals from the collective unconscious about the nature of a quantum evolutionary event approaching the human species.Jonathan currently resides in Boulder, Colorado.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Jonathan Zap
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Published on
Feb 24, 2012
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Pages
216
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ISBN
9781470128739
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Language
English
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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