Marjorie Prime (TCG Edition)

Theatre Communications Group
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Finalist for the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Drama

Now a major motion picture starring Jon Hamm, Geena Davis, Lois Smith, and Tim Robbins.

“An elegant, thoughtful and quietly unsettling drama. Marjorie Primeoperates by stealth… at some point, you realize that it’s been landing skillfully targeted punch after punch, right where it hurts… It keeps developing in your head, like a photographic negative, long after you have seen it.”

—Ben Brantley, New York Times

“Brilliant…A startling and profound new drama.” —Jesse Green, New York

“Memory is an essential element of life—crucial to thought, feeling, progress, identity. But it also comes into play with particular power and meaning after someone who has been loved dies. And it is this tension between life and death—with memory functioning as connective tissue—that animates Jordan Harrison’s subtly shattering, Marjorie Prime.” —Hedy Weiss, Chicago Sun-Times

“Jordan Harrison’s play has all the hallmarks of the best science fiction; it’s clever in conceit, alive with humor, surprising in its turns, and terribly haunting by the time the lights go out.”

—Rollo Romig, New Yorker

With help from an intriguingly innovative technology in a future not far from our present, Marjorie examines her past, sometimes replacing her realities with idealized memories. Through deeply drawn characters—both real and in the form of artificial intelligence companions, or “Primes” —Harrison burrows into troubling questions of the digital age: What would we remember, and what would we forget, given the power of authorship? Will we be any less human, once computers know us better than we know ourselves?

Jordan Harrison grew up on Bainbridge Island, near Seattle. His plays include Maple and Vine, The Grown-Up, Doris to Darlene, Amazons and Their Men, Finn in the Underworld, Act a Lady, Kid-Simple, and Futura. Harrison is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Hodder Fellowship, the Kesselring Prize, and the Horton Foote Prize, among other awards. He was a 2015 Pulitzer Prize finalist for Marjorie Prime. A graduate of the Brown MFA program, Harrison is a writer-producer for the Netflix original series Orange is the New Black.

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About the author

Jordan Harrison grew up on Bainbridge Island, near Seattle. His play Maple and Vine premiered in the Humana Festival at Actors Theatre of Louisville and went on to productions at American Conservatory Theater, Playwrights Horizons and City Theatre, among others. Harrison’s other Humana Festival premieres include last season’s The Grown-Up, Act a Lady and Kid-Simple. Other works include Doris to Darlene, a cautionary valentine (Playwrights Horizons), Amazons and Their Men (Clubbed Thumb), Finn in the Underworld (Berkeley Repertory Theatre), Futura (three-way premiere at Portland Center Stage, NAATCO and the Theatre @ Boston Court) and The Museum Play. His children’s musical The Flea and the Professor premiered at the Arden Theatre and won the Barrymore Award for Best Production; his grown-up musical Suprema was workshopped at the O’Neill’s National Music Theater Conference. Harrison is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Hodder Fellowship, the Kesselring Prize, the Roe Green Award from Cleveland Play House, the Heideman Award, the Loewe Award for Musical Theater, Jerome and McKnight Fellowships, a NYSCA grant and a NEA/TCG residency with the Empty Space. A graduate of Stanford University and the Brown MFA program, Harrison is an alumnus of New Dramatists. He is an Affiliated Artist with Clubbed Thumb, the Civilians and the Playwrights’ Center. Harrison currently writes for the Netflix original series Orange Is the New Black, and is adapting his play Maple and Vine for SundanceTV.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Theatre Communications Group
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Published on
Dec 26, 2016
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Pages
96
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ISBN
9781559368490
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Language
English
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Genres
Drama / American / General
Social Science / Death & Dying
Social Science / Gerontology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST • For readers of Atul Gawande, Andrew Solomon, and Anne Lamott, this inspiring, exquisitely observed memoir finds hope and beauty in the face of insurmountable odds as an idealistic young neurosurgeon attempts to answer the question What makes a life worth living?

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY
The New York Times Book Review • People • NPR • The Washington Post • Slate • Harper’s Bazaar • Time Out New York • Publishers Weekly • BookPage

Finalist for the PEN Center USA Literary Award in Creative Nonfiction and the Books for a Better Life Award in Inspirational Memoir

At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi’s transformation from a naïve medical student “possessed,” as he wrote, “by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life” into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality.

What makes life worth living in the face of death? What do you do when the future, no longer a ladder toward your goals in life, flattens out into a perpetual present? What does it mean to have a child, to nurture a new life as another fades away? These are some of the questions Kalanithi wrestles with in this profoundly moving, exquisitely observed memoir.

Paul Kalanithi died in March 2015, while working on this book, yet his words live on as a guide and a gift to us all. “I began to realize that coming face to face with my own mortality, in a sense, had changed nothing and everything,” he wrote. “Seven words from Samuel Beckett began to repeat in my head: ‘I can’t go on. I’ll go on.’” When Breath Becomes Air is an unforgettable, life-affirming reflection on the challenge of facing death and on the relationship between doctor and patient, from a brilliant writer who became both.
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