The City of the Senses: Urban Culture and Urban Space

Springer
Free sample

Offers an innovative, interdisciplinary approach which opens up new ways of understanding urban culture and space. The author approaches the city as essentially a 'material' place where people live, work, and participate in social practices within historical limits set not by sensory experience or cultural meanings but material social conditions.
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About the author

Kimberly DeFazio teaches in the English Department at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. Her writings have appeared in such journals as Nature, Society and Thought, and Textual Practice and in the edited collection Confronting Universalities: Aesthetics and Politics under the Sign of Globalisation.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer
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Published on
Oct 24, 2011
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Pages
190
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ISBN
9780230370357
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Anthropology / Cultural & Social
Social Science / Anthropology / General
Social Science / Anthropology / Physical
Social Science / General
Social Science / Sociology / General
Social Science / Sociology / Urban
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Reading information

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“This unique contribution to the field of urban and regional studies counteracts current trends in the ethnographies of urban movements by offering, with great hindsight, an analysis from a physical space, and from first-hand experience. The focal point is one building, and the author is a former tenant. This perspective is appealing, especially in an era of global connections where macro social movements are on the front line of urban life and research.” —Nathalie Boucher, Director and Researcher, Respire, and Affiliated Professor Assistant, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Concordia University, Canada.

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“With…evidence from recent genetic and anthropological research, [Zuk] offers a dose of paleoreality.” —Erin Wayman, Science News

We evolved to eat berries rather than bagels, to live in mud huts rather than condos, to sprint barefoot rather than play football—or did we? Are our bodies and brains truly at odds with modern life? Although it may seem as though we have barely had time to shed our hunter-gatherer legacy, biologist Marlene Zuk reveals that the story is not so simple. Popular theories about how our ancestors lived—and why we should emulate them—are often based on speculation, not scientific evidence.

Armed with a razor-sharp wit and brilliant, eye-opening research, Zuk takes us to the cutting edge of biology to show that evolution can work much faster than was previously realized, meaning that we are not biologically the same as our caveman ancestors. Contrary to what the glossy magazines would have us believe, we do not enjoy potato chips because they crunch just like the insects our forebears snacked on. And women don’t go into shoe-shopping frenzies because their prehistoric foremothers gathered resources for their clans. As Zuk compellingly argues, such beliefs incorrectly assume that we’re stuck—finished evolving—and have been for tens of thousands of years. She draws on fascinating evidence that examines everything from adults’ ability to drink milk to the texture of our ear wax to show that we’ve actually never stopped evolving. Our nostalgic visions of an ideal evolutionary past in which we ate, lived, and reproduced as we were “meant to” fail to recognize that we were never perfectly suited to our environment. Evolution is about change, and every organism is full of trade-offs.

From debunking the caveman diet to unraveling gender stereotypes, Zuk delivers an engrossing analysis of widespread paleofantasies and the scientific evidence that undermines them, all the while broadening our understanding of our origins and what they can really tell us about our present and our future.

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He left us, however, this remarkable document of discovery. The book is Carter's personal story of the greatest adventure of his life--one that has not been surpassed in nearly a century of archaeology. 

In 1904, retired American lawyer, Theodore Davis, famously declared that The Valley of the Kings in Thebes had given up all of its secrets, leaving nothing more to be discovered. He relinquished his exclusive rights to dig in The Valley. 

But as Howard Carter states in this volume, "The history of The Valley has never lacked the dramatic element." Some 18 years later, Carter made the richest archaeological discovery in history within yards of where Davis had dug. 

The world immediately became obsessed with everything Tutankhamen. From architecture, to household goods, to fashion, a early 20th-century surge in fascination with ancient Egypt took hold across the globe. 

Howard Carter, too, had been obsessed with finding Tut. The discovery would consume the rest of Carter's life. After becoming known to the world, Howard Carter died in relative obscurity in 1939. 

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Care has been taken to create a well-formatted book for Kindle. It includes images from the original publication. You can even take it with you on your smartphone if you have the Kindle app installed, and then refer to it while visiting the Tutankhamun exhibit in one of the cities it visits in North America. 

Remember to LOOK INSIDE by clicking the cover image in the upper left of this page. Buy this book today and you'll read it again and again.
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