Designing Usable Apps: An agile approach to User Experience Design

Winchelsea Press (Winchelsea Systems Ltd.)
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Discover how to create software products your customers will love!
In today's competitive software market, to attract and retain users and customers, software products and websites need attractive, eye-catching interfaces, and they must provide frustration-free user experiences.

Whether you're designing a mobile, tablet, desktop, or web-based software application, Designing Usable Apps will teach you the principles you need to know and the tried-and-tested techniques you'll want to use to make your product easy to learn and fun to use.

Designing Usable Apps is a compact, practical guide to the key ideas, principles, and practices of User Experience design and usability evaluation. Read this book, and you will:

  • Discover the fundamental psychological principles behind how people use computing devices and software
  • Learn techniques for discovering the needs and characteristics of your users
  • Become familiar with the recommended techniques and project processes, both for agile and traditional teams, that will help ensure usability is built in to your product throughout the software development lifecycle
  • Understand techniques for creating effective prototypes and lightweight software design specifications
  • Grasp the key processes and techniques for evaluating and testing the usability of software designs, prototypes, and products
  • Recognize what problems cause user frustration and dissatisfaction, so you can identify and correct usability issues
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About the author

Kevin Matz is the founder of Winchelsea Systems Ltd., a software product design consultancy, and is the designer and creator of the ChapterLab word processing and project management application for book authors. Kevin blogs about usability and user experience design at his blog, Architecting Usability. He holds a BSc in Computer Science from the University of Victoria and an MSc in Software Development from the Open University (UK).

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Additional Information

Publisher
Winchelsea Press (Winchelsea Systems Ltd.)
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Published on
Oct 6, 2013
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Pages
260
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ISBN
9780986910913
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Language
English
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Genres
Computers / Hardware / Tablets
Computers / Internet / Application Development
Computers / Programming / General
Computers / Programming / Mobile Devices
Computers / Social Aspects / Human-Computer Interaction
Computers / Software Development & Engineering / General
Computers / Software Development & Engineering / Systems Analysis & Design
Computers / User Interfaces
Computers / Web / Web Programming
Design / Graphic Arts / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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