Aché Life History: The Ecology and Demography of a Foraging People

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"...a magnificent achievement, and a landmark in at least three distinct fields: anthropological demography, human evolutionary ecology, and hunter-gatherer studies...." -- Evolutionary Anthropology

The Ache, whose life history the authors recounts, are a small indigenous population of hunters and gatherers living in the neotropical rainforest of eastern Paraguay. This is part exemplary ethnography of the Ache and in larger part uses this population to make a signal contribution to human evolutionary ecology.

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Publisher
Transaction Publishers
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Pages
561
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ISBN
9780202364063
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Anthropology / Cultural & Social
Social Science / Demography
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / General
Social Science / Reference
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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