Latino City: Immigration and Urban Crisis in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 1945–2000

UNC Press Books
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Latino City explores the transformation of Lawrence, Massachusetts, into New England's first Latino-majority city. Like many industrial cities, Lawrence entered a downward economic spiral in the decades after World War II due to deindustrialization and suburbanization. The arrival of tens of thousands of Puerto Ricans and Dominicans in the late twentieth century brought new life to the struggling city, but settling in Lawrence was fraught with challenges. Facing hostility from their neighbors, exclusion from local governance, inadequate city services, and limited job prospects, Latinos fought and organized for the right to make a home in the city.

In this book, Llana Barber interweaves the histories of urban crisis in U.S. cities and imperial migration from Latin America. Pushed to migrate by political and economic circumstances shaped by the long history of U.S. intervention in Latin America, poor and working-class Latinos then had to reckon with the segregation, joblessness, disinvestment, and profound stigma that plagued U.S. cities during the crisis era, particularly in the Rust Belt. For many Puerto Ricans and Dominicans, there was no "American Dream" awaiting them in Lawrence; instead, Latinos struggled to build lives for themselves in the ruins of industrial America.

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About the author

Llana Barber is associate professor of American studies at the State University of New York College at Old Westbury.

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Additional Information

Publisher
UNC Press Books
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Published on
Mar 8, 2017
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Pages
340
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ISBN
9781469631356
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / State & Local / New England (CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT)
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / Hispanic American Studies
Social Science / Sociology / Urban
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This content is DRM protected.
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