It's What I Do: A Photographer's Life of Love and War

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"A brutally real and unrelentingly raw memoir."--Kirkus (starred review)

War photographer Lynsey Addario’s memoir It’s What I Do is the story of how the relentless pursuit of truth, in virtually every major theater of war in the twenty-first century, has shaped her life. What she does, with clarity, beauty, and candor, is to document, often in their most extreme moments, the complex lives of others. It’s her work, but it’s much more than that: it’s her singular calling.

Lynsey Addario was just finding her way as a young photographer when September 11 changed the world. One of the few photojournalists with experience in Afghanistan, she gets the call to return and cover the American invasion. She makes a decision she would often find herself making—not to stay home, not to lead a quiet or predictable life, but to set out across the world, face the chaos of crisis, and make a name for herself.

Addario finds a way to travel with a purpose. She photographs the Afghan people before and after the Taliban reign, the civilian casualties and misunderstood insurgents of the Iraq War, as well as the burned villages and countless dead in Darfur. She exposes a culture of violence against women in the Congo and tells the riveting story of her headline-making kidnapping by pro-Qaddafi forces in the Libyan civil war.

Addario takes bravery for granted but she is not fearless. She uses her fear and it creates empathy; it is that feeling, that empathy, that is essential to her work. We see this clearly on display as she interviews rape victims in the Congo, or photographs a fallen soldier with whom she had been embedded in Iraq, or documents the tragic lives of starving Somali children. Lynsey takes us there and we begin to understand how getting to the hard truth trumps fear.

As a woman photojournalist determined to be taken as seriously as her male peers, Addario fights her way into a boys’ club of a profession. Rather than choose between her personal life and her career, Addario learns to strike a necessary balance. In the man who will become her husband, she finds at last a real love to complement her work, not take away from it, and as a new mother, she gains an all the more intensely personal understanding of the fragility of life.

Watching uprisings unfold and people fight to the death for their freedom, Addario understands she is documenting not only news but also the fate of society. It’s What I Do is more than just a snapshot of life on the front lines; it is witness to the human cost of war.

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About the author

Lynsey Addario is an American photojournalist whose work appears regularly in The New York Times, National Geographic, and Time magazine. She has covered conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq, Lebanon, Darfur, and the Congo, and has received numerous awards, including the MacArthur Genius Grant. In 2009, she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize as part of the New York Times team for International Reporting.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Penguin
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Published on
Feb 5, 2015
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Pages
368
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ISBN
9781101599068
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Artists, Architects, Photographers
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
Photography / Photojournalism
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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From the Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist and New York Times bestselling author, a stunning and personally curated selection of her work across the Middle East, South Asia, and Africa

Pulitzer Prize–winning photojournalist and MacArthur Fellow Lynsey Addario has spent the last two decades bearing witness to the world’s most urgent humanitarian and human rights crises. Traveling to the most dangerous and remote corners to document crucial moments such as Afghanistan under the Taliban immediately before and after the 9/11 attacks, Iraq following the US-led invasion and dismantlement of Saddam Hussein’s government, and western Sudan in the aftermath of the genocide in Darfur, she has captured through her photographs visual testimony not only of war and injustice but also of humanity, dignity, and resilience.
 
In this compelling collection of more than two hundred photographs, Addario’s commitment to exposing the devastating consequences of human conflict is on full display. Her subjects include the lives of female members of the military, as well as the trauma and abuse inflicted on women in male-dominated societies; American soldiers rescuing comrades in the Korengal Valley of Afghanistan, and Libyan opposition troops trading fire in Benghazi. Interspersed between her commanding and arresting images are personal journal entries and letters, as well as revelatory essays from esteemed writers such as Dexter Filkins, Suzy Hansen, and Lydia Polgreen. A powerful and singular work from one of the most brilliant and influential photojournalists working today, Of Love & War is a breathtaking record of our complex world in all its inescapable chaos, conflict, and beauty.
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Finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography

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From the Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist and New York Times bestselling author, a stunning and personally curated selection of her work across the Middle East, South Asia, and Africa

Pulitzer Prize–winning photojournalist and MacArthur Fellow Lynsey Addario has spent the last two decades bearing witness to the world’s most urgent humanitarian and human rights crises. Traveling to the most dangerous and remote corners to document crucial moments such as Afghanistan under the Taliban immediately before and after the 9/11 attacks, Iraq following the US-led invasion and dismantlement of Saddam Hussein’s government, and western Sudan in the aftermath of the genocide in Darfur, she has captured through her photographs visual testimony not only of war and injustice but also of humanity, dignity, and resilience.
 
In this compelling collection of more than two hundred photographs, Addario’s commitment to exposing the devastating consequences of human conflict is on full display. Her subjects include the lives of female members of the military, as well as the trauma and abuse inflicted on women in male-dominated societies; American soldiers rescuing comrades in the Korengal Valley of Afghanistan, and Libyan opposition troops trading fire in Benghazi. Interspersed between her commanding and arresting images are personal journal entries and letters, as well as revelatory essays from esteemed writers such as Dexter Filkins, Suzy Hansen, and Lydia Polgreen. A powerful and singular work from one of the most brilliant and influential photojournalists working today, Of Love & War is a breathtaking record of our complex world in all its inescapable chaos, conflict, and beauty.
Traduit de l’anglais (États-Unis) par Karine Lalechère

Au moment des attentats du 11-Septembre, Lynsey Addario est une toute jeune photographe. Parmi les premiers journalistes à se rendre sur place, elle suit l’invasion américaine en Afghanistan et se fait bientôt un nom au sein de cette profession d’hommes.
De ses premiers reportages à Cuba et au Pakistan à la guerre en Syrie, en passant par son kidnapping avec trois de ses confrères par des forces pro-Kadhafi au cours de la guerre civile libyenne, Lynsey Addario revient sur son parcours exceptionnel, à travers les théâtres d’opérations majeurs du xxie siècle. Armée de son seul appareil photo, elle témoigne du soulèvement des peuples et de leur lutte acharnée pour la liberté. Victimes civiles de la guerre d’Irak et de la guerre civile au Darfour, enfants somaliens, femmes afghanes vivant sous le joug des talibans et Congolaises victimes de violences, tous sont passés devant son objectif obstiné.
Avec la clarté, la candeur et la beauté qui caractérisent son travail, elle documente la vie des autres dans les périodes les plus troubles. Elle ne se contente pas de capturer des images. Elle témoigne du destin des sociétés, des ravages de la guerre, et du prix à payer. Car tel est son métier. Et, au-delà, son appel singulier.

Lynsey Addario est une photoreporter américaine dont les clichés apparaissent régulièrement dans le New York Times, le National Geographic et le Time. Elle a couvert des zones de conflit en Afghanistan, en Irak, au Liban, au Darfour et au Congo, et a reçu de nombreux prix pour son œuvre, dont le Prix MacArthur et le Prix Pulitzer pour le reportage international.

« Des mémoires qui témoignent d’un courage hors du commun. » Washington Post « Derrière l’objectif, Lynsey Addario est une artiste de l’empathie, le témoin non pas de grandes idées sur le sacrifice et la souffrance, mais de la nature humaine, et de la vie. » Boston Globe « Les mémoires d’une jeune femme douée d’une profonde empathie, qui a fait sa vocation de la compréhension intime du monde qui l’entoure. »Los Angeles Times
 Lynsey Addario ainda tentava se estabelecer no fotojornalismo quando os atentados do 11 de Setembro sacudiram o mundo. Por ser um dos poucos profissionais da época com alguma experiência no Afeganistão, ela foi chamada para voltar ao Oriente Médio e cobrir a invasão americana. Foi quando fez uma escolha que se repetiria muitas vezes depois: abrir mão do conforto e da previsibilidade a fim de correr o mundo confrontando com sua câmera as mais duras verdades.

As imagens captadas pelas lentes de Lynsey parecem buscar sempre um propósito maior. No livro, ela retrata os afegãos antes e depois do regime talibã, os cidadãos vitimados pela guerra e os insurgentes incompreendidos no Iraque, as aldeias incendiadas e os incontáveis mortos em Darfur. Expõe a cultura de violência contra a mulher no Congo e narra a ocasião do próprio sequestro, orquestrado pelas forças pró-Kadafi durante a guerra civil na Líbia — uma história marcante que ganhou destaque na mídia internacional.

Apesar da presumível bravura, Lynsey não é de todo destemida. Do medo, ela tira o olhar de empatia essencial à profissão. Quando entrevista vítimas de estupro, fotografa um soldado alvejado em combate ou documenta a trágica vida das crianças famintas na Somália, é essa empatia que nos transporta para os lugares onde ela esteve, e então começamos a entender como o ímpeto de retratar a verdade triunfa sobre o terror.

Testemunha de tantas insurreições, Lynsey sabe que não documenta apenas notícias, mas o próprio destino da humanidade. O que ela faz, com clareza, suavidade e beleza, é registrar a realidade muitas vezes em sua condição mais extrema. Mais do que um trabalho, isso é sua missão. Mais do que a história de uma vida nas linhas de combate, É isso que eu faço é um testemunho tocante do custo humano da guerra.

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