A la recherche du temps perdu: Tome II - A l'ombre des jeunes filles en fleurs

Ligaran

Extrait : "Ma mère, quand il fut question d'avoir pour la première fois M. de Norpois à dîner, ayant exprimé le regret que le Professeur Cottard fût en voyage et qu'elle-même eût entièrement cessé de fréquenter Swann, car l'un et l'autre eussent sans doute intéressé l'ancien ambassadeur, mon père répondit qu'un convive éminent, un savant illustre, comme Cottard, ne pouvait jamais mal faire dans un dîner, (...)"
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Additional Information

Publisher
Ligaran
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Published on
Feb 4, 2015
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Pages
440
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ISBN
9782335008432
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Language
French
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Genres
Fiction / Classics
Fiction / General
Fiction / Historical
Fiction / Literary
Fiction / Sagas
Literary Collections / European / French
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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In Search of Lost Time (French: À la recherche du temps perdu)— previously also translated as Remembrance of Things Past, is a novel in seven volumes, written by Marcel Proust (1871–1922). It is considered to be his most prominent work, known both for its length and its theme of involuntary memory, the most famous example being the "episode of the madeleine" which occurs early in the first volume. It gained fame in English in translations by C. K. Scott Moncrieff and Terence Kilmartin as Remembrance of Things Past, but the title In Search of Lost Time, a literal rendering of the French, has gained usage since D. J. Enright adopted it for his revised translation published in 1992.

The novel began to take shape in 1909. Proust continued to work on it until his final illness in the autumn of 1922 forced him to break off. Proust established the structure early on, but even after volumes were initially finished he kept adding new material and edited one volume after another for publication. The last three of the seven volumes contain oversights and fragmentary or unpolished passages, as they existed only in draft form at the death of the author; the publication of these parts was overseen by his brother Robert.

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The long-awaited fifth volume--representing "the very summit of Proust's art" (Slate)--in the acclaimed Penguin translation of "the greatest literary work of the twentieth century" (The New York Times)

Carol Clark's acclaimed translation of The Prisoner introduces a new generation of American readers to the literary riches of Marcel Proust. The fifth volume in Penguin Classics' superb new edition of In Search of Lost Time--the first completely new translation of Proust's masterpiece since the 1920s--brings us a more comic and lucid prose than readers of English have previously been able to enjoy.

The titular "prisoner" is Albertine, the tall, dark orphan with whom Marcel had fallen in love at the end of Sodom and Gomorrah (volume 4). Albertine has moved in with Marcel in his family's apartment in Paris, where the pair have a seemingly limitless supply of money and are chaperoned only by Marcel's judgmental family servant, Françoise. Marcel, who worries obsessively about Albertine's relationships with other women, grows more and more irrational in his attempts to control her, keeping her prisoner in his apartment and buying her couture gowns, furs, and jewelry in an attempt to protect her from herself and from the outside world and. And yet in addition to being a tragedy of possessive love, The Prisoner is also a comedy of human folly and misunderstanding, linked to the other volumes of the larger novel through its themes of class differences, art, irrationality, social snobbery, and, of course, time and memory.
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