Bitching

Open Road Media
Free sample

In the early 1970s, the national conversation regarding feminism was very different. Public discussions of womanhood—single life, marriage, workplace harassment, rights, gripes—were often channeled through movement spokeswomen and always refracted through the lens of talking to men about men. Little was shared about the chats happening behind closed doors where everyday women talked to women without the threat of men listening in. But, all that changed with the book Bitching.

Originally published in 1973, Bitching is journalist and author Marion Meade’s deep and insightful investigation into the real dialogue happening inside coffee klatches, consciousness‐raising groups, and therapist’s sessions. Using excerpts from real taped conversations, Meade presents the frustration, anger, resigned acceptance, and scathing humor that make up the female experience from birth to grave.

For the first time, male chauvinist behavior goes fully examined and unexcused, and the roles men force upon women get broken down to their sometimes ridiculous component parts. A snapshot into a key time in the feminist movement, this book is a must‐read for anyone interested in how far we have come . . . or how much we have stayed the same.
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About the author

Marion Meade studied at Northwestern University in Illinois and later received a master’s from Columbia Graduate School of Journalism. She worked as a freelance writer and her articles have appeared in leading magazines and newspapers, including the New York Times, McCall’s, the Village Voice, Ms. Magazine, and Cosmopolitan. Meade has written novels, biographies, and nonfiction books. Bitching was a significant contribution to the second phase of development in the feminist movement. She has written biographies of Victoria Woodhull (Free Woman), Eleanor of Aquitaine, Madame Blavatsky, Buster Keaton (Cut to the Chase), Woody Allen (The Unruly Life of Woody Allen), and Dorothy Parker (What Fresh Hell Is This?). She has published two historical novels: Sybille, which narrates the life of a woman troubadour in thirteenth century southern France, during Europe’s first great holocaust, the Albigensian crusade; and Stealing Heaven, The Love Story of Heloise and Abelard. She lives in New York City.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road Media
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Published on
Apr 1, 2014
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Pages
250
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ISBN
9781497602342
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Feminism & Feminist Theory
Social Science / Gender Studies
Social Science / Women's Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Despite popular misconceptions, some men do believe in feminism and support the feminist movement. Since the 1970s, supportive men in North America, Britain, and Australia have published magazines, formed anti-sexism organizations, and worked on a variety of feminist-inspired projects. ^IMen Who Believe in Feminism^R examines and recounts the motives and strategies, the successes and failures, and the challenges and triumphs of those men who have worked to support the feminist movement, combat sexism, and convey profeminist messages to different audiences. This timely and unique book invites readers interested in the future of gender relations to learn more about men's involvement and activism in redressing gender-based inequality.

Profeminist men's groups have been responsible for many successful anti-sexist campaigns and have often gained the support of feminist women. But they have also faced a number of challenges from various constituencies. The author describes reactions from anti-feminists, radical gay men, skeptical feminists, and others who question the profeminists' motives and accountability. Still, while profeminist organizations struggle, and sometimes fail, to overcome the challenges they face, the author contends that many men continue to believe in and support feminism and that it is the role of feminist groups and other interested women's programs to encourage profeminist activism, support men in their efforts to convey their profeminist message, and advocate the ongoing participation of men in the crusade for gender equality.

View the Author's website!
Seely, the youngest elected president of California's chapter of the National Organization for Women, combines her own story of third-wave feminism with an overview of the feminist movement and words to guide others. Third-wave feminists are aware of both the victories won by earlier feminists and the problems of class, race, sexual orientation, and internationalism that must still be overcome. This book weaves a deep respect for the foremothers with commonsense discussion of current obstacles and suggestions for direct action, resulting in a work that reminds us of what too many activists forget-every progressive movement has a long history, few organizing tricks are new, and problems must be understood before they can be solved. Seely includes booklists, time lines, web sites, and how-to tips that will help readers over the bridge from her insights to real world activism. For midsize to larger public libraries, academic libraries, and all feminist collections.
—Library Journal
"Want to know what it means to be a feminist of the third wave? Megan Seely's Fight Like a Girl is the answer; there’s enough information here to make you angry and enough resources to make you an effective activist.
—Jennifer Baumgardner and Amy Richards, co-authors of Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism and the Future
“Always engaging, interesting, and insightful. Fascinating and sure to engage many young women!”
—Sherrie A. Inness, editor of Action Chicks
“The resources, helpful hints about organizing and working with the press, the short bios of companies and fabulous feminists are great!”
—Caryn Aviv, co-editor of American Queer, Then and Now
Fight Like a Girl is packed with both information and inspiration for young women by a young woman who knows her stuff. It's a terrific practical feminist resource book with an optimistic attitude that says in clear language, “You're in charge of your life and here's how to stay that way”.
—Gloria Feldt, former president, Planned Parenthood Federation of America and author of The War on Choice: The Right-Wing Attack on Women's Rights and How to Fight Back
Fight Like a Girl offers a fearless vision for the future of feminism. By boldly detailing what is at stake for women and girls today, Megan Seely outlines the necessary steps to achieve true political, social and economic equity for all. Reclaiming feminism for a new generation, Fight Like a Girl speaks to young women who embrace feminism in substance but not necessarily in name.
With an eye toward what it takes to create actual change, Seely offers a practical guide for how to get involved, take action and wage successful events and campaigns.
The book is full of valuable resources for novice and committed activists alike, including such features as “How to Write a Press Release,” “Guidelines to a Good Media Interview,” “A Feminist Shopping Guide,” and a list of over 100 Fabulous Feminist Resources, including organizations, websites, and events to attend. Each chapter is full of ideas, both big and small, for ways to get involved, get active, and make a difference.
Exploring such issues as body image and self-acceptance, education and empowerment, health and sexuality, political representation, economic justice, and violence against women, Fight Like a Girl looks at the challenges that women and girls face while emphasizing the strength that they independently, and collectively, embody. Seely delves into the politics of the feminist movement, exploring both women's history and current–day realities with easy-to-follow lists and timelines like those on “Women Who Made a Difference,” “Chronology of the U.S. Women's Movement,” and “Do's and Don'ts for Young Feminists.”
A Third Wave manifesto as well as an introduction to feminism for a new generation, Fight Like A Girl is a powerful blueprint for young women today.
Victoria Woodhull is a historical figure too often ignored and undervalued by historians. Although she never achieved political power, her actions and her presence on the political scene helped begin to change the way Americans thought about the right to vote, particularly women’s suffrage, and she set the stage for political emancipations to come throughout the twentieth century.

Woodhull was a product of and a revolutionary within the socially conservative Victorian era, which predominated in the United States as much as it did in England. She was an anomaly within her time, an unlikely and unconventional woman. She came from a background of poverty and her careers prior to entering politics included fortune‐telling, acting, being a stock broker, journalism, and lecturing on women’s rights. She ran for president of the United States in 1872. At that time, she had twice been divorced and she outraged even the feminists of her day by refusing to confine her campaign to the issue of women’s suffrage. She advocated a single sexual standard for men and women, legalization of prostitution, reform of the marriage and family institutions, and “free love.” She shocked a nation largely because her plain‐speaking was designed to expose the endemic hypocrisy of “respectable” people in society.

Marion Meade has created a vivid picture of the colorful figure that was Victoria Woodhull, but she also fully portrays the era in which she lived, in all of its truest and often most unflattering colors. She makes the 1870s read in many ways like the 1970s, not just because Victoria Woodhull was far ahead of her own time but also because many people in the present era are still culturally behind the times.
The 1975 publication of Robin Tolmach Lakoff's Language and Woman's Place, is widely recognized as having inaugurated feminist research on the relationship between language and gender, touching off a remarkable response among language scholars, feminists, and general readers. For the past thirty years, scholars of language and gender have been debating and developing Lakoff's initial observations. Arguing that language is fundamental to gender inequality, Lakoff pointed to two areas in which inequalities can be found: Language used about women, such as the asymmetries between seemingly parallel terms like master and mistress, and language used by women, which places women in a double bind between being appropriately feminine and being fully human. Lakoff's central argument that "women's language" expresses powerlessness triggered a controversy that continues to this day. The revised and expanded edition presents the full text of the original first edition, along with an introduction and annotations by Lakoff in which she reflects on the text a quarter century later and expands on some of the most widely discussed issues it raises. The volume also brings together commentaries from twenty-six leading scholars of language, gender, and sexuality, within linguistics, anthropology, modern languages, education, information sciences, and other disciplines. The commentaries discuss the book's contribution to feminist research on language and explore its ongoing relevance for scholarship in the field. This new edition of Language and Woman's Place not only makes available once again the pioneering text of feminist linguistics; just as important, it places the text in the context of contemporary feminist and gender theory for a new generation of readers.
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