Wolf in Man's Clothing

The Sarah Keate Mysteries

Book 6
Open Road Media
Free sample

Two nurses investigate a millionaire’ s suspicious gunshot wound in this “absorbing” mystery by a Special Edgar Award–winning author (The New York Times). It takes a compound fracture to bring Craig Brent and Drue Cable together. A millionaire injured in an auto accident, Craig falls quickly for his nurse, wedding Drue as soon as his arm is mended. Craig’s father, disgusted to see his son marrying below his station, pressures him into a divorce, and the whirlwind marriage dies in Reno. A year later, the young lovers are given a second chance, when a bullet shatters Craig’s shoulder. The family insists Craig shot himself while cleaning his gun, but Drue has never known a man to clean his gun at eleven o’clock at night. She calls on Sarah Keate, whose nursing skill is matched only by her deductive reasoning, to unravel the mystery. When Sarah arrives at the Brent house, Craig is in a drugged sleep. If he is ever to awake, the nurses must unmask the killer in his family.
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About the author

Mignon G. Eberhart (1899–1996) wrote dozens of mystery novels over nearly sixty years. Born in Lincoln, Nebraska, she began writing in high school, swapping English essays with her fellow students in exchange for math homework. She attended Nebraska Wesleyan University, and in the 1920s began writing fiction in her spare time, publishing her first novel, The Patient in Room 18, in 1929. With the follow-up, While the Patient Slept (1931), she won a $5,000 Scotland Yard Prize, and by the end of the 1930s she was one of the most popular female mystery writers on the planet. Before Agatha Christie ever published a Miss Marple novel, Eberhart wrote romantic crime fiction with female leads. Eight of her books, including While the Patient Slept and Hasty Wedding (1938), were adapted for film. Elected a Mystery Writers of America Grand Master in 1971, Eberhart continued publishing roughly a book a year until the 1980s. Her final novel, Three Days for Emeralds, was published in 1988. 
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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road Media
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Published on
May 29, 2012
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Pages
300
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ISBN
9781453257241
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Mystery & Detective / Cozy / General
Fiction / Mystery & Detective / Women Sleuths
Fiction / Thrillers / Suspense
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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In these three novels of romantic suspense, the Edgar Award winner proves once again that she “can weave an almost flawless mystery” (The New Yorker).
 
In a prolific career that spanned seven decades, Mignon G. Eberhart made a name for herself as “America’s Agatha Christie.” Praised by fellow writers ranging from Gertrude Stein, who called her “one of the best mystifiers in America,” to Mary Higgins Clark, who hailed her as “one of America’s favorite writers,” Eberhart penned classic mystery novels of romantic suspense, usually with female leads and often set in exotic locales. The three novels collected here—written in 1949, 1955, and 1964—offer further evidence that “Eberhart’s name on mysteries is like sterling on silver” (Miami News).
 
House of Storm: On a Caribbean island in the path of a hurricane, Nonie is torn between the older man she’s engaged to and the man she’s truly in love with—a suspected murderer.
 
“Mounting tension . . . one of [Eberhart’s] most successful glamour romances yet.” —The New York Times
 
Postmark Murder: Following the death of a wealthy Chicago businessman, his ward Laura March must protect her fellow heir—an orphaned girl from Poland—and clear herself of a murder after a mysterious stranger is stabbed.
 
“A nice example of [Eberhart’s] powers . . . Intelligently complicated.” —The New Yorker
 
Call After Midnight: A late-night phone call from Jenny Vleedam’s ex-husband revealing that his girlfriend has been shot places the divorcée in danger.
 
“Eberhart tells one of her better mystery-romances in Call After Midnight.” —The New York Times
From #1 New York Times bestselling author Stephen King, the most riveting and unforgettable story of kids confronting evil since It—publishing just as the second part of It, the movie, lands in theaters.

In the middle of the night, in a house on a quiet street in suburban Minneapolis, intruders silently murder Luke Ellis’s parents and load him into a black SUV. The operation takes less than two minutes. Luke will wake up at The Institute, in a room that looks just like his own, except there’s no window. And outside his door are other doors, behind which are other kids with special talents—telekinesis and telepathy—who got to this place the same way Luke did: Kalisha, Nick, George, Iris, and ten-year-old Avery Dixon. They are all in Front Half. Others, Luke learns, graduated to Back Half, “like the roach motel,” Kalisha says. “You check in, but you don’t check out.”

In this most sinister of institutions, the director, Mrs. Sigsby, and her staff are ruthlessly dedicated to extracting from these children the force of their extranormal gifts. There are no scruples here. If you go along, you get tokens for the vending machines. If you don’t, punishment is brutal. As each new victim disappears to Back Half, Luke becomes more and more desperate to get out and get help. But no one has ever escaped from the Institute.

As psychically terrifying as Firestarter, and with the spectacular kid power of It, The Institute is Stephen King’s gut-wrenchingly dramatic story of good vs. evil in a world where the good guys don’t always win.
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