The Psychology of Mentally Deficient Children

Science Press
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Publisher
Science Press
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Published on
Dec 31, 1906
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Pages
111
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Language
English
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This content is DRM free.
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"This book is written with a view to its use in normal schools. A course in general psychology is presupposed, since no space is devoted to the explanation of common psychological terms, though a glossary is added for easy reference. The authors are of opinion that the study of a special branch, such as child psychology, should follow rather than precede, or even accompany, a study of the more general science. It is intended for a textbook, not for reference reading. To this end special features have been employed, e.g. marginal questions as well as topical headings, only limited references, sets of questions with each chapter. These last are of two distinct kinds, "exercises" and "questions for discussion." The former consist of problems, queries to be answered in writing, directions for observations, field-work; the latter are suggested for oral use in the classroom. Either or both kinds are given for each chapter. They have been tested by use, and it is believed that greater value will be secured if they are utilized in the manner indicated. The references following each chapter are in no way supposed to be adequate indexes of source material; but they suggest what may reasonably be required of a group of students working with a good-sized library at command. Constant emphasis has been thrown on the physiological basis of the tendencies discussed, and Thorndike's classification of instincts, on the basis of the responses made, is adhered to throughout. Though in some instances suggestions for teaching are made, yet the greatest space is devoted to a descriptive study of children as differentiated from adults. For immature students it may be found easier to begin with chapter II, postponing or omitting chapter I, also the last part of chapter XVII which deals wholly with statistics"--Introduction. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).
"The art of teaching is based primarily upon the science of psychology. In this book the authors have sought to make clear the principles of psychology which are involved in teaching, and to show definitely their application in the work of the classroom. The book has been written in language as free from technical terms as is possible. In a discussion of the methods of teaching it is necessary to consider the ends or aims involved, as well as the process. The authors have, on this account, included a chapter on the work of the teacher, in which is discussed the aims of education. The success or failure of the work of a teacher is determined by the changes which are brought to pass in the children who are being taught. This book, therefore, includes a chapter on the measurement of the achievements of children. Throughout the book the discussion of the art of teaching is always modified by an acceptance upon the part of the writers of the social purpose of education. The treatment of each topic will be found to be based upon investigations and researches in the fields of psychology and education which involve the measurement of the achievements of children and of adults under varying conditions. Wherever possible, the relation between the principle of teaching laid down and the scientific inquiry upon which it is based is indicated. Any careful study of the mental life and development of children reveals at the same time the unity and the diversity of the process involved. For the sake of definiteness and clearness, the authors have differentiated between types of mental activity and the corresponding types of classroom exercises. They have, at the same time, sought to make clear the interdependence of the various aspects of teaching method and the unity involved in mental development"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).
"This book is written with a view to its use in normal schools. A course in general psychology is presupposed, since no space is devoted to the explanation of common psychological terms, though a glossary is added for easy reference. The authors are of opinion that the study of a special branch, such as child psychology, should follow rather than precede, or even accompany, a study of the more general science. It is intended for a textbook, not for reference reading. To this end special features have been employed, e.g. marginal questions as well as topical headings, only limited references, sets of questions with each chapter. These last are of two distinct kinds, "exercises" and "questions for discussion." The former consist of problems, queries to be answered in writing, directions for observations, field-work; the latter are suggested for oral use in the classroom. Either or both kinds are given for each chapter. They have been tested by use, and it is believed that greater value will be secured if they are utilized in the manner indicated. The references following each chapter are in no way supposed to be adequate indexes of source material; but they suggest what may reasonably be required of a group of students working with a good-sized library at command. Constant emphasis has been thrown on the physiological basis of the tendencies discussed, and Thorndike's classification of instincts, on the basis of the responses made, is adhered to throughout. Though in some instances suggestions for teaching are made, yet the greatest space is devoted to a descriptive study of children as differentiated from adults. For immature students it may be found easier to begin with chapter II, postponing or omitting chapter I, also the last part of chapter XVII which deals wholly with statistics"--Introduction. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).
"The art of teaching is based primarily upon the science of psychology. In this book the authors have sought to make clear the principles of psychology which are involved in teaching, and to show definitely their application in the work of the classroom. The book has been written in language as free from technical terms as is possible. In a discussion of the methods of teaching it is necessary to consider the ends or aims involved, as well as the process. The authors have, on this account, included a chapter on the work of the teacher, in which is discussed the aims of education. The success or failure of the work of a teacher is determined by the changes which are brought to pass in the children who are being taught. This book, therefore, includes a chapter on the measurement of the achievements of children. Throughout the book the discussion of the art of teaching is always modified by an acceptance upon the part of the writers of the social purpose of education. The treatment of each topic will be found to be based upon investigations and researches in the fields of psychology and education which involve the measurement of the achievements of children and of adults under varying conditions. Wherever possible, the relation between the principle of teaching laid down and the scientific inquiry upon which it is based is indicated. Any careful study of the mental life and development of children reveals at the same time the unity and the diversity of the process involved. For the sake of definiteness and clearness, the authors have differentiated between types of mental activity and the corresponding types of classroom exercises. They have, at the same time, sought to make clear the interdependence of the various aspects of teaching method and the unity involved in mental development"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).
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