Interactive Art and Embodiment

Arts Future Book

Book 1
Gylphi Limited
Free sample

What is interactive art? Is this a genre? A medium? An art movement? Must a work be physically active to be classified as such, or do we interact when we sense and make sense? Is a switch-throw or link-click enough - I do this, and that happens - or must subjects and objects be confused over time? Is interaction multiple in its engagements (relational), or a one-to-one reaction (programmed)? Are interactive designs somehow more democratic and individualized than others, or is that merely a commercial strategy to sell products and ideas?


This book argues that interactive art frames moving-thinking-feeling as embodiment; the body is addressed as it is formed, and in relation. Interactive installations amplify how the body's inscriptions, meanings, and matters unfold out, while the world's sensations, concepts, and matters enfold in. Interactive artwork creates situations that enhance, disrupt, and alter experience and action in ways that call attention to our varied relationships with and as both structure and matter.


Nathaniel Stern's inspirational book, Interactive Art and Embodiment, outlines how new media has the ability to intervene in, and challenge, not only the construction of bodies and identities, but also the ongoing and emergent processes of embodiment, as they happen. It includes immersive descriptions of a significant number of interactive artworks and over 40 colour images.


The theorists, artists, practitioners and curators discussed in this text include Brian Massumi, Christiane Paul, Sarah Cook, Beryl Graham, Kelli Fuery, Theodore Watson, William Kentridge, Char Davies, Stelarc, Janet Cardiff, Carlo Zanni, Tero Saarinen, Karen Barad, Daniel Rozin, Richard Schechner, Nicole Ridgway, Rebecca Schneider, Annie Sprinkle, Karen Finley, VALIE EXPORT, The Guerrilla Girls, Tegan Bristow, Brian Knep, Anna Munster, Zach Lieberman, Golan Levin, Simon Penny, Camille Utterback, Jean-Luc Nancy, The Millefiore Effect, Nick Crossley, Mathieu Briand, Scott Snibbe, David Rokeby, José Gil, Erin Manning, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, and Norah Zuniga Shaw


Contents

Acknowledgments

Series Foreword

Introduction: Art Philosophy

Chapter 1: Digital is as Digital Does

Chapter 2: The Implicit Body as Performance

Chapter 3: A Critical Framework for Interactive Art

Chapter 4: Body-Language

Chapter 5: Social-Anatomies

Chapter 6: Flesh-Space

Chapter 7: Implicating Art Works

In Production: Companion Chapter

Bibliography

Index

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About the author

Nathaniel Stern is an artist and writer, Fulbright grantee and professor, interventionist and public citizen. He has produced and collaborated on projects ranging from ecological, participatory and online interventions, interactive, immersive and mixed reality environments, to prints, sculptures, videos, performances and hybrid forms. His book, Interactive Art and Embodiment: The Implicit Body as Performance, takes a close look at the stakes for interactive and digital art, and his ongoing work in industry has helped launch dozens of new businesses, products and ideas. Stern has been featured in the likes of the Wall Street Journal, Guardian UK, Huffington Post, Daily Mail, Washington Post, Daily News, BBC's Today show, Wired, Time, Forbes, Fast Company, Scientific American, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Leonardo Journal of Art, Science and Technology, Rhizome, Furtherfield, Turbulence, and more. According to Chicago's widely popular Bad at Sports art podcast, Stern has "the most varied and strange bio of maybe anyone ever on the show," and South Africa's Live Out Loud magazine calls him a "prolific scholar" as well as artist, whose work is "quite possibly some of the most relevant around." Dubbed one of Milwaukee's "avant-garde" (Journal Sentinel), Stern has been called "an interesting and prolific fixture" (Artthrob.co.za) behind many "multimedia experiments" (Time.com), "accessible and abstract simultaneously" (Art and Electronic Media web site), someone "with starry, starry eyes" (Wired.com) who "makes an obscene amount of work in an obscene amount of ways" (Bad at Sports). According to Caleb A. Scharf at Scientific American, Stern's art is "tremendous fun" but also "fascinating" in how it is "investigating the possibilities of human interaction and art."

Stern is an Associate Professor of Art and Design in Peck School of the Arts at the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, and a Research Associate at the Research Centre, Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture, University of Johannesburg.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Gylphi Limited
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Published on
Aug 5, 2013
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9781780240114
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Language
English
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Genres
Art / Criticism & Theory
Art / Digital
Art / History / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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The mainstream press often celebrates the ‘tweeting’, ‘facebooking’ and ‘gramming’ of art commentary. Yet online forms of art criticism have a much longer and more varied history than we think. Far preceding the art discussions happening on the likes of Twitter and Facebook. Before art discussions took place on social media, there were networked art projects and art critical Bulletin Board Systems, email discussion lists and blogs. Art Criticism Online: A History provides the first in-depth history of art criticism following the Internet. The book considers the core stages of development and considers where critical practice is heading in the future.


Charlotte Frost's Art Criticism Online provides a much needed account and indispensable survey of the ways in which Western art criticism has been profoundly affected and changed by the online environment. Building on the history of networked and participatory criticism predating the Internet, Frost traces three different phases of online art criticism unfolding in early discussion groups, on listservs, and within today's blogosphere and social media platforms. The book expertly captures nuanced transformations in art criticism's content, form and style, analyzing how approaches have shifted in response to the evolution of the art world terrain. Art Criticism Online successfully manages to provide readers with a map of the dynamic expressions of today's critical culture. --Christiane Paul, Adjunct Curator of Digital Art, Whitney Museum, Director/Chief Curator, Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, Parsons/The New School


So what happened to art criticism, anyway? This lively history is a vital resource for anyone interested in this question. Drawing on a half-century of examples, the book discusses the new, experimental writing practices the internet has made possible, and its destructive effects, making a persuasive case that art criticism hasn't gone away it's just changed radically. --Michael Connor, Artistic Director, Rhizome

The mainstream press often celebrates the ‘tweeting’, ‘facebooking’ and ‘gramming’ of art commentary. Yet online forms of art criticism have a much longer and more varied history than we think. Far preceding the art discussions happening on the likes of Twitter and Facebook. Before art discussions took place on social media, there were networked art projects and art critical Bulletin Board Systems, email discussion lists and blogs. Art Criticism Online: A History provides the first in-depth history of art criticism following the Internet. The book considers the core stages of development and considers where critical practice is heading in the future.


Charlotte Frost's Art Criticism Online provides a much needed account and indispensable survey of the ways in which Western art criticism has been profoundly affected and changed by the online environment. Building on the history of networked and participatory criticism predating the Internet, Frost traces three different phases of online art criticism unfolding in early discussion groups, on listservs, and within today's blogosphere and social media platforms. The book expertly captures nuanced transformations in art criticism's content, form and style, analyzing how approaches have shifted in response to the evolution of the art world terrain. Art Criticism Online successfully manages to provide readers with a map of the dynamic expressions of today's critical culture. --Christiane Paul, Adjunct Curator of Digital Art, Whitney Museum, Director/Chief Curator, Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, Parsons/The New School


So what happened to art criticism, anyway? This lively history is a vital resource for anyone interested in this question. Drawing on a half-century of examples, the book discusses the new, experimental writing practices the internet has made possible, and its destructive effects, making a persuasive case that art criticism hasn't gone away it's just changed radically. --Michael Connor, Artistic Director, Rhizome

An art-historical perspective on interactive media art that provides theoretical and methodological tools for understanding and analyzing digital art.

Since the 1960s, artworks that involve the participation of the spectator have received extensive scholarly attention. Yet interactive artworks using digital media still present a challenge for academic art history. In this book, Katja Kwastek argues that the particular aesthetic experience enabled by these new media works can open up new perspectives for our understanding of art and media alike. Kwastek, herself an art historian, offers a set of theoretical and methodological tools that are suitable for understanding and analyzing not only new media art but also other contemporary art forms. Addressing both the theoretician and the practitioner, Kwastek provides an introduction to the history and the terminology of interactive art, a theory of the aesthetics of interaction, and exemplary case studies of interactive media art.

Kwastek lays the historical and theoretical groundwork and then develops an aesthetics of interaction, discussing such aspects as real space and data space, temporal structures, instrumental and phenomenal perspectives, and the relationship between materiality and interpretability. Finally, she applies her theory to specific works of interactive media art, including narratives in virtual and real space, interactive installations, and performance—with case studies of works by Olia Lialina, Susanne Berkenheger, Stefan Schemat, Teri Rueb, Lynn Hershman, Agnes Hegedüs, Tmema, David Rokeby, Sonia Cillari, and Blast Theory.

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