Exploring Horizons for Domestic Animal Genomics: Workshop Summary

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Recognizing the important contributions that genomic analysis can make to agriculture, production and companion animal science, evolutionary biology, and human health with respect to the creation of models for genetic disorders, the National Academies convened a group of individuals to plan a public workshop that would: (1) assess these contributions; (2) identify potential research directions for existing genomics programs; and (3) highlight the opportunities of a coordinated, multi-species genomics effort for the science and policymaking communities. Their efforts culminated in a workshop sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health. The workshop was convened on February 19, 2002. The goal of the workshop was to focus on domestic animal genomics and its integration with other genomics and functional genomics projects.
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Publisher
National Academies Press
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Published on
Aug 27, 2002
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Pages
54
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ISBN
9780309169127
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Life Sciences / General
Science / Life Sciences / Genetics & Genomics
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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