Explaining International Relations 1918-1939: A Students Guide

Andrews UK Limited
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Between 1918 and 1939 diplomats and politicians sought to create a lasting world order. However, they struggled to maintain stability in an international system still struggling with the legacy of the First World War. This eBook focuses on addressing ten of the most complex and challenging questions that face students of inter war diplomacy, including: 1. How did the decisions taken at the Paris Peace Conference affect Europe? 2. How did the decisions taken at the Paris Peace Conference affect Asia? 3. What was the significance of the Washington Naval Conference? 4. What was the significance of the Locarno Treaties? 5. How did the appointment of Hitler in 1933 affect International Relations? 6. What was the impact of the Abyssinia Crisis? 7. How did the Spanish Civil War affect international relations? 8. Why did Britain pursue a policy of appeasement? 9. Why did Stalin and Hitler sign a treaty in 1939? 10. Who is to blame for the outbreak of war in September 1939? This e-book also features additional advice on essay writing and other related subjects.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Andrews UK Limited
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Published on
Mar 7, 2016
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Pages
79
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ISBN
9781785384271
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / General
History / Study & Teaching
History / World
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Nick Shepley
Henry Green: Class, Style, and the Everyday offers a critical prism through which Green's fiction—from his earliest published short stories, as an Eton schoolboy, through to his last dialogic novels of the 1950s—can be seen as a coherent, subtle, and humorous critique of the tension between class, style, and realism in the first half of the twentieth century. The study extends on-going critical recognition that Green's work is central to the development of the novel from the twenties to the fifties, acting as a vital bridge between late modernist, inter-war, post-war, and postmodernist fiction. The overarching contention is that the shifting and destabilizing nature of Green's oeuvre sets up a predicament similar to that confronted by theorists of the everyday. Consequently, each chapter acknowledges the indeterminacy of the writing, whether it be: the non-singular functioning (or malfunctioning) of the name; the open-ended, purposefully ambiguous nature of its symbols; the shifting, cinematic nature of Green's prose style; the sensitive, but resolutely unsentimental depictions of the working-classes and the aristocracy in the inter-war period; the impact of war and its inconsistent irruptions into daily life; or the ways in which moments or events are rapidly subsumed back into the flux of the everyday, their impact left uncertain. Critics have, historically, offered up singular readings of Green's work, or focused on the poetic or recreative qualities of certain works, particularly those of the 1940s. Green's writing is, undoubtedly, poetic and extraordinary, but this book also pays attention to the clichéd, meta-textual, and uneventful aspects of his fiction.
Nick Shepley
Exam Board: AQA
Level: AS/A-level
Subject: History
First Teaching: September 2015
First Exam: June 2016

AQA approved

Enhance and expand your students' knowledge and understanding of their AQA breadth study through expert narrative, progressive skills development and bespoke essays from leading historians on key debates.

- Builds students' understanding of the events and issues of the period with authoritative, well-researched narrative that covers the specification content

- Introduces the key concepts of change, continuity, cause and consequence, encouraging students to make comparisons across time as they advance through the course

- Improves students' skills in tackling interpretation questions and essay writing by providing clear guidance and practice activities

- Boosts students' interpretative skills and interest in history through extended reading opportunities consisting of specially commissioned essays from practising historians on relevant debates

- Cements understanding of the broad issues underpinning the period with overviews of the key questions, end-of-chapter summaries and diagrams that double up as handy revision aids

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