Red Sun Rising: Japan, China and the West: 1894-1941

Andrews UK Limited
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In the second half of the 19th Century, Japan awoke from centuries of isolation to be a surprising and warlike challenge to European power in Asia. This ebook charts the rise of Japan's power and her dominion over China. It also explores how Japan came to challenge European nations convinced of their own invincibility in the east, culminating in the attack on the USA at Pearl Harbour.
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About the author

Nick Shepley is a wrriter, teacher and historian. He lives in Wales with his wife.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Andrews UK Limited
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Published on
Dec 7, 2015
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Pages
64
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ISBN
9781782345831
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Asia / China
History / Asia / Japan
History / Modern / 20th Century
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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