Enon: A Novel

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NAMED ONE OF THE BEST NOVELS OF THE YEAR BY
The Wall Street Journal • American Library Association • Kirkus Reviews

A stunning allegorical novel about one man’s enduring love for his daughter


In Enon, Paul Harding follows a year in the life of Charlie Crosby as he tries to come to terms with a shattering personal tragedy. Grandson of George Crosby (the protagonist of Tinkers), Charlie inhabits the same dynamic landscape of New England, its seasons mirroring his turbulent emotional odyssey. Along the way, Charlie’s encounters are brought to life by his wit, his insights into history, and his yearning to understand the big questions. A stunning mosaic of human experience, Enon affirms Paul Harding as “a contemporary master and one of our most important writers” (Publishers Weekly, starred review).

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“Harding conveys the common but powerful bond of parental love with devastating accuracy. . . . [He] is a major voice in American fiction.”Chicago Tribune
 
“Paul Harding’s novel Tinkers won the Pulitzer Prize; its stunning successor, Enon, only raises the bar.”O: The Oprah Magazine
 
“Extraordinary . . . a darkly intoxicating read . . . [Harding’s] prose is steeped in a visionary, transcendentalist tradition that echoes Blake, Rilke, Emerson, and Thoreau.”The New Yorker
 
“So wild and riveting it’s practically an aria . . . Harding is a superb stylist.”Entertainment Weekly
 
“[Charlie’s grief], shaped by a gifted writer’s caressing attention, can bring about moments of what Charlie calls ‘brokenhearted joy.’”The Wall Street Journal
 
“Astonishing . . . a work of fiction that feels authentic as memoir.”Financial Times
 
“Read Enon to live longer in the harsh, gorgeous atmosphere that Paul Harding has created.”San Francisco Chronicle
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About the author

Paul Harding is the author of the novel Tinkers, which won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. He has received a Guggenheim Fellowship and the PEN/Robert Bingham Fellowship for Writers. He was a fiction fellow at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts, and has taught at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Harvard University, and Grinnell College.
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3.5
74 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Random House
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Published on
Sep 10, 2013
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Pages
272
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ISBN
9780812984606
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Literary
Fiction / Psychological
Fiction / Visionary & Metaphysical
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

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