Dissecting the Social: On the Principles of Analytical Sociology

Cambridge University Press
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Over the past few decades serious reservations have been expressed about the explanatory power of sociological theory and research. In this important book, leading social theorist Peter Hedström outlines the foundations of an analytically oriented sociology that seeks to address this criticism. Building on his earlier influential contributions to contemporary debates, Professor Hedström argues for a systematic development of sociological theory so that it has the explanatory power and precision to inform sociological research and understanding. He discusses various mechanisms of action and interaction and shows how strong links can be forged between the micro and the macro, and between theory and empirical research. Combining approaches to theory and methodology and using extensive examples to illustrate how they might be applied, this clear, concise and original book will appeal to a broad range of social scientists.
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About the author

Peter Hedström is Professor of Sociology and Fellow of Nuffield College, Oxford. He has published numerous articles in leading academic journals and is co-author of Social Mechanisms (Cambridge, 1998) with R. Swedberg.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
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Published on
Nov 10, 2005
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Pages
192
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ISBN
9781139447331
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / History & Theory
Social Science / Sociology / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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