Spaces, Spatiality and Technology

Computer Supported Cooperative Work

Book 5
Springer Science & Business Media
Free sample

separated by the exigencies of the design life cycle into another compartment, that makes invisible the (prior) technical work of engineers that is not directly pertinent to the application work of practitioners. More recently (and notably after the work of Greisemer and Star) the black box has been opened and infrastructure has been discussed in terms of the social relations of an extended group of actors that includes developers. Ethical and political issues are involved (cf f accountable computing). Writing broadly within this context, Day (chapter 11) proposes that the concept of 'surface' can assist us to explore space as the product of 'power and the affective and expressive role for materials', rather than the background to this. Surfaces are the 'variously textured...sites for mixtures between bodies', and are thus the 'sites for events'. The notions of 'folding' and 'foldability' and 'unfolding' are discussed at length, as metaphors that account for the interactions of bodies in space across time. Some of the contributors to this volume focus on ways in which we may experience multiple infrastructures. Dix and his colleagues, for example, in chapter 12 explore a complex of models - of spatial context, of 'mixed reality boundaries' and of human spatial understanding across a number of field projects that make up the Equator project to explain the ways in which co-existing multiple spaces are experienced.
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About the author

Edinburgh Napier University

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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Mar 30, 2006
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Pages
306
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ISBN
9781402032738
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Architecture / Design, Drafting, Drawing & Presentation
Computers / Computer Graphics
Computers / Computer Science
Computers / General
Computers / Social Aspects / Human-Computer Interaction
Computers / User Interfaces
Language Arts & Disciplines / Library & Information Science / General
Social Science / Human Geography
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Our universities are facing immense pressures from within because of the increase in the ‘publish or perish’ syndrome. There are severe budgetary demands on university libraries attempting to enable access to this increasing avalanche of information. University teaching also needs to prepare graduates for a rapidly changing and connected world. This book explores the role of technology in this challenging scenario. Technology is portrayed as part contributor to the challenges higher education faces, and also part contributor to the solutions we need to explore. This book is not a ‘doom and gloom’ exposition but is forward-looking, offering fresh insights and new strategies for understanding the nature of scholarly communication in higher education.

In this book there are three threads that are constantly intertwined – information literacy, eLearning and digital publishing – with information literacy acting as the glue that connects eLearning and digital publishing. This book was designed to occupy a unique niche in the literature accessed by library and publishing specialists, and by university teachers and planners. It examines the interfaces between the work done by these four groups of university staff who have been in the past quite separate from, or only marginally related to, each other. Yet all four groups are directly and intimately connected with the main functions of universities – the creation, management and dissemination of knowledge in a scholarly and reflective manner.

The structure of the book has three main sections: the first has primarily an educational focus, the second a focus on digital publishing, and the third builds on the first two sections to examine overall implications for the growth of knowledge and scholarly communication.

This collection brings perspectives (in alphabetical order) from Australia, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China, Singapore, Taiwan, United Kingdom and United States of America. Various chapters, therefore, examine the central concerns with different lenses. Our ability to understand the extent of the shifts that are occurring in modern universities, and still need to occur in the next few years, relies on our ability to synthesize ideas and experiences from a wide range of university staff. This is just what we hope this book offers.

Avatars at Work and Play brings together contributions from leading social scientists and computer scientists who have conducted research on virtual environments used for collaboration and online gaming. They present a well-rounded and state-of-the-art overview of current applications of multi-user virtual environments, ranging from highly immersive virtual reality systems to internet-based virtual environments on personal computers. The volume is a follow-up to a previous essay collection, ‘The Social Life of Avatars’, which explored general issues in this field. This collection goes further, examining uses of shared virtual environments in practical settings such as scientific collaboration, distributed meetings, building models together, and others. It also covers online gaming in virtual environments, which has attracted hundreds of thousands of users and presents an opportunity for studying a myriad of social issues. Covering both ‘work’ and ‘play’, the volume brings together issues common to the two areas, including:

What kind of avatar appearance is suitable for different kinds of interaction? How best to foster collaboration and promote usable shared virtual spaces? What kinds of activities work well in different types of virtual environments and systems?

Avatars at Work and Play will be required reading for computer scientists and social scientists who are researching and developing virtual worlds. It will be useful on courses in New Media and human-computer interaction

Listening to, buying and sharing music is an immensely important part of everyday life. Yet recent technological developments are increasingly changing how we use and consume music. This book collects together the most recent studies of music consumption, and new developments in music technology. It combines the perspectives of both social scientists and technology designers, uncovering how new music technologies are actually being used, along with discussions of new music technologies still in development. With a specific focus on the social nature of music, the book breaks new ground in bringing together discussions of both the social and technological aspects of music use. Chapters cover topics such as the use of the iPod, music technologies which encourage social interaction in public places, and music sharing on the internet.

Prof. Dorothy Miell, (Open University) and Associate Dean (Curriculum ad Awards) in the Social Sciences Faculty, Milton Keynes, UK says: "A highly original and stimulating collection of contributions addressing aspects of our everyday music experiences in the modern world. The picture it paints of music as highly social and collaborative, yet deeply personal, is a rich and complex one which advances thinking about the many functions music plays in our lives. It is often the case that new ideas and exciting developments emerge at the boundaries between existing disciplines and bodies of knowledge, and in this text the editors have succeeded in bringing together work from music, technical and social science backgrounds to point out possibilities for researchers at these boundaries as they can be applied to a fast moving and exciting area of knowledge".

A valuable collection for anyone concerned with the future of music technology, this book will be of particular interest to those designing new music technologies, those working in the music industry, along with students of music and new technology.

It is well-established that while cognitive psychology provides a sound foundation for an understanding of our interactions with digital technology, this is no longer sufficient to make sense of how we use and experience the personal, relational and ubiquitous technologies that pervade everyday life. This book begins with a consideration of the nature of experience itself, and the user experience (UX) of digital technology in particular, offering a new, broader definition of the term. This is elaborated though a wide-ranging and rigorous review of what are argued to be the three core UX elements. These are involvement, including shared sense making, familiarity, appropriation and “being-with” technologies; affect, including emotions with and about technology, impressions, feelings and mood; and aesthetics, including embodied aesthetics and neuroaesthetics. Alongside this, new insights are introduced into how and why much of our current use of digital technology is simply idling, or killing time.

A particular feature of the book is a thorough treatment of parallel, and sometimes competing, accounts from differing academic traditions. Overall, the discussion considers both foundational and more recent theoretical and applied perspectives from social psychology, evolutionary psychology, folk psychology, neuroaesthetics, neuropsychology, the philosophy of technology, design and the fine arts. This broad scope will be enlightening and stimulating for anyone concerned in understanding UX.

A Psychology of User Experience stands as a companion text to the author’s HCI Redux text which discusses the contemporary treatment of cognition in human-computer interaction.

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