The Translator's Dialogue

Benjamins Translation Library

Book 24
John Benjamins Publishing
1
Free sample

The Translator’s Dialogue: Giovanni Pontiero is a tribute to an outstanding translator of literary works from Portuguese, Luso-Brasilian, Italian and Spanish into English. The translator introduced authors such as Carlos Drummond de Andrade, Manuel Bandeira, Clarice Lispector and José Saramago to the English reading world.
Pontiero’s essays shed light on the process of literary translation and its impact on cultural perception. This process is exemplified by Pontiero the translator and analyst, some of the authors he collaborated with, publishers’ editors and literary critics and, finally, by an unpublished translation of a short story by José Saramago, Coisas.
Read more
5.0
1 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
John Benjamins Publishing
Read more
Published on
Oct 30, 1997
Read more
Pages
252
Read more
ISBN
9789027283535
Read more
Read more
Best For
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / Translating & Interpreting
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
In the late Qing period, from the Opium War to the 1911 revolution, China absorbed the initial impact of Western arms, manufactures, science and culture, in that order. This volume of essays deals with the reception of Western literature, on the evidence of translations made. Having to overcome Chinese assumptions of cultural superiority, the perception that the West had a literature worth notice grew only gradually. It was not until the very end of the 19th century that a translation of a Western novel (La dame aux camélias) achieved popular acclaim. But this opened the floodgates: in the first decade of the 20th century, more translated fiction was published than original fiction.
The core essays in this collection deal with aspects of this influx according to division of territory. Some take key works (e.g. Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Byron’s “The Isles of Greece”), some sample genres (science fiction, detective fiction, fables, political novels), the common attention being to the adjustments made by translators to suit the prevailing aesthetic, cultural and social norms, and/or the current needs and preoccupations of the receiving public. A broad overview of translation activities is given in the introduction.
To present the subject in its true guise, that of a major cultural shift, supporting papers are included to fill in the background and to describe some of the effects of this foreign invasion on native literature. A rounded picture emerges that will be intelligible to readers who have no specialized knowledge of China.
A New York Times Notable Book for 2011
One of The Economist's 2011 Books of the Year

People speak different languages, and always have. The Ancient Greeks took no notice of anything unless it was said in Greek; the Romans made everyone speak Latin; and in India, people learned their neighbors' languages—as did many ordinary Europeans in times past (Christopher Columbus knew Italian, Portuguese, and Castilian Spanish as well as the classical languages). But today, we all use translation to cope with the diversity of languages. Without translation there would be no world news, not much of a reading list in any subject at college, no repair manuals for cars or planes; we wouldn't even be able to put together flat-pack furniture.

Is That a Fish in Your Ear? ranges across the whole of human experience, from foreign films to philosophy, to show why translation is at the heart of what we do and who we are. Among many other things, David Bellos asks: What's the difference between translating unprepared natural speech and translating Madame Bovary? How do you translate a joke? What's the difference between a native tongue and a learned one? Can you translate between any pair of languages, or only between some? What really goes on when world leaders speak at the UN? Can machines ever replace human translators, and if not, why?

But the biggest question Bellos asks is this: How do we ever really know that we've understood what anybody else says—in our own language or in another? Surprising, witty, and written with great joie de vivre, this book is all about how we comprehend other people and shows us how, ultimately, translation is another name for the human condition.

This book breaks new ground in translation theory and practice. The central question is: In what ways are translations affected by text types? The two main areas of investigation are: A. What are the advantages of focusing on text types when trying to understand the process of translation? How do translators tackle different text types in their daily practice? B. To what extent and in what areas are text types identical across languages and cultures? What similarities and dissimilarities can be observed in text types of original and translated texts?Part I deals with methodological aspects and offers a typology of translations both as product and as process. Part II is devoted to domain-specific texts in a cross-cultural perspective, while Part III is concerned with terminology and lexicon as well as the constraints of mode and medium involving dubbing and subtitling as translation methods. Sonnets, sagas, fairy tales, novels and feature films, sermons, political speeches, international treaties, instruction leaflets, business letters, academic lectures, academic articles, medical research articles, technical brochures and legal documents are but some of the texts under investigation.
In sum, this volume provides a theoretical overview of major problems and possibilities as well as investigations into a variety of text types with practical suggestions that deserve to be weighted by anyone considering the relation between text typology and translation. The volume is indispensable for the translator in his/her efforts to become a “competent text-aware professional”.
The late twentieth-century transition from a paper-oriented to a media-oriented society has triggered the emergence of Audiovisual Translation as the most dynamic and fastest developing trend within Translation Studies. The growing interest in this area is a clear indication that this discipline is going to set the agenda for the theory, research, training and practice of translation in the twenty-first century. Even so, this remains a largely underdeveloped field and much needs to be done to put Screen Translation, Multimedia Translation or the wider implications of Audiovisual Translation on a par with other fields within Translation Studies. In this light, this collection of essays reflects not only the “state of the art” in the research and teaching of Audiovisual Translation, but also the professionals’ experiences. The different contributions cover issues ranging from reflections on professional activities, to theory, the impact of ideology on Audiovisual Translation, and the practices of teaching and researching this new and challenging discipline.In expanding further the ground covered by the John Benjamins’ book (Multi)Media Translation (2001), this book seeks to provide readers with a deeper insight into some of the specific concepts, problems, aims and terminology of Audiovisual Translation, and, by this token, to make these specificities emerge from within the wider nexus of Translation Studies, Film Studies and Media Studies. In a quickly developing technical audiovisual world, Audiovisual Translation Studies is set to become the academic field that will address the complex cultural issues of a pervasively media-oriented society.
©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.