Ayia Sotira: A Mycenaean Chamber Tomb Cemetery in the Nemea Valley, Greece

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This volume is the final publication of the results of excavation of six Mycenaean chamber tombs in the Late Bronze Age cemetery of Ayia Sotira within the Nemea Valley of the Argolid region of Greece.The work presented includes artifactual and ecofactual remains such as pottery, jewelry, figurines, metal objects, human skeletons, and botanical remains. The book is richly illustrated with maps, plans, drawings, photos, and tables of data.
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Additional Information

Publisher
INSTAP Academic Press
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Published on
Sep 30, 2017
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Pages
368
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ISBN
9781623034207
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Ancient / General
History / Ancient / Greece
Social Science / Archaeology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Twenty years ago one of the editors of this volume, John Cherry of the University of Michigan, looked forward to a day when the 'Frogs round the Pond' (active intensive survey projects working around the Mediterranean) could produce real insights into the development of human societies by comparing and synthesizing the data they had collected. Despite the theoretical advances in survey methodology that have been discussed and implemented since that date, few scholars (with the exception of Sue Alcock, the other editor - also at Michigan) have attempted to use survey data to answer the real questions social historians have been asking. In this volume a number of prominent scholars re-commit to the original goal of intensive survey projects and discuss what original insights over twenty years of survey work have brought to our understanding of the Mediterranean world. Contents: Introduction (Susan E. Alcock and John F. Cherry); Intraregional and interregional comparison of occupation histories in three Italian regions; the RPC project (Peter Attema and Martijn van Leusen); A comparative perspective on settlement pattern and population change in Mesoamerican and Mediterranean civilizations (Richard E. Blanton); Site by site: Combining survey and excavation data to chart patterns of socio-political change in Bronze Age Crete (Tim Cunningham and Jan Driessen); Are the landscapes of Greek prehistory hidden? A comparative approach (Jack L. Davis); Accounting for ARS: fineware and sites in Sicily and Africa (Elizabeth Fentress, Sergio Fontana, Robert Bruce Hitchner, and Philip Perkins); Mapping and manuring: can we compare sherd density figures? (Michael Given); Mapping the Roman world: the contribution of field survey data (David Mattingly and Rob Witcher); Demography and survey (Robin Osborne); Problems and possibilities in comparative survey: a North African perspective (David L. Stone); Sample size matters! The paradox of global trends and local surveys (Nicola Terrenato); Side-by-Side and Back-to-Front: Exploring intra-regional Latitudinal and Longitudinal comparability in survey data. Three case studies from Metaponto, Southern Italy (Stephen Thompson); Solving the puzzle of the archaeological labyrinth: time perspectivism in Mediterranean surface archaeology (LuAnn Wandsnider); From nucleation to dispersal: trends in settlement pattern in the northern Fertile Crescent (T. J. Wilkinson, Jason Ur, and Jesse Casana); Comparative settlement patterns during the Bronze Age in the northeastern Peloponnesos (James C. Wright); Appendix. Internet resources for Mediterranean regional survey projects: a preliminary listing (Jennifer Gates, Susan E. Alcock, and John F. Cherry).
In the first authoritative biography of Alexander the Great written for a general audience in a generation, classicist and historian Philip Freeman tells the remarkable life of the great conqueror.

The celebrated Macedonian king has been one of the most enduring figures in history. He was a general of such skill and renown that for two thousand years other great leaders studied his strategy and tactics, from Hannibal to Napoleon, with countless more in between. He flashed across the sky of history like a comet, glowing brightly and burning out quickly: crowned at age nineteen, dead by thirty-two. He established the greatest empire of the ancient world; Greek coins and statues are found as far east as Afghanistan. Our interest in him has never faded.

Alexander was born into the royal family of Macedonia, the kingdom that would soon rule over Greece. Tutored as a boy by Aristotle, Alexander had an inquisitive mind that would serve him well when he faced formidable obstacles during his military campaigns. Shortly after taking command of the army, he launched an invasion of the Persian empire, and continued his conquests as far south as the deserts of Egypt and as far east as the mountains of present-day Pakistan and the plains of India. Alexander spent nearly all his adult life away from his homeland, and he and his men helped spread the Greek language throughout western Asia, where it would become the lingua franca of the ancient world. Within a short time after Alexander’s death in Baghdad, his empire began to fracture. Best known among his successors are the Ptolemies of Egypt, whose empire lasted until Cleopatra.

In his lively and authoritative biography of Alexander, classical scholar and historian Philip Freeman describes Alexander’s astonishing achievements and provides insight into the mercurial character of the great conqueror. Alexander could be petty and magnanimous, cruel and merciful, impulsive and farsighted. Above all, he was ferociously, intensely competitive and could not tolerate losing—which he rarely did. As Freeman explains, without Alexander, the influence of Greece on the ancient world would surely not have been as great as it was, even if his motivation was not to spread Greek culture for beneficial purposes but instead to unify his empire. Only a handful of people have influenced history as Alexander did, which is why he continues to fascinate us.
Thucydides called his account of two decades of war between Athens and Sparta “a possssion for all time,” and indeed it is the first and still most famous work in the Western historical tradition. Considered essential reading for generals, statesmen, and liberally educated citizens for more than 2,000 years, The Peloponnesian War is a mine of military, moral, political, and philosophical wisdom.

Thucydides called his account of two decades of war between Athens and Sparta “a possssion for all time,” and indeed it is the first and still most famous work in the Western historical tradition. Considered essential reading for generals, statesmen, and liberally educated citizens for more than 2,000 years, The Peloponnesian War is a mine of military, moral, political, and philosophical wisdom.

However, this classic book has long presented obstacles to the uninitiated reader. Robert Strassler's new edition removes these obstacles by providing a new coherence to the narrative overall, and by effectively reconstructing the lost cultural context that Thucydides shared with his original audience. Based on the venerable Richard Crawley translation, updated and revised for modern readers. The Landmark Thucydides includes a vast array of superbly designed and presented maps, brief informative appendices by outstanding classical scholars on subjects of special relevance to the text, explanatory marginal notes on each page, an index of unprecedented subtlety, and numerous other useful features.

In any list of the Great Books of Western Civilization, The Peloponnesian War stands near the top. This authoritative new edition will ensure that its greatness is appreciated by future generations.
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