The English Lyric Tradition: Reading Poetic Masterpieces of the Middle Ages and Renaissance

McFarland
Free sample

Modern readers can sometimes be unsure about the language and the literary conventions of medieval and Renaissance verse—lyrical works written at a time before poetry was assumed to be about personal expression. This readers’ guide introduces to a 21st century audience some of the greatest masterpieces of English poetry spanning five centuries. Focusing on poems by Chaucer, Wyatt, Shakespeare, Milton and others, the author discusses the development of poetic technique, explains the rhetorical culture of earlier centuries and describes the various lyric forms—including lover’s complaints, sonnets and elegies—that poets used to communicate with readers.
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About the author

R. James Goldstein teaches medieval literature and literary theory at Auburn University. He has published a book on the invention of Scottish nationalism as well as numerous essays on medieval poetry.
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Additional Information

Publisher
McFarland
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Published on
Mar 23, 2017
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Pages
236
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ISBN
9781476627564
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / Medieval
Literary Criticism / General
Poetry / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Praise for A Distant Mirror
 
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“Wise, witty, and wonderful . . . a great book, in a great historical tradition.”—Commentary

NOTE: This edition does not include color images.
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