The History of Classical Music For Beginners

Red Wheel/Weiser
2
Free sample

Music history is nearly as old as human civilization itself, and while it has permeated the arts and popular culture for centuries, it still has this mystifying aura surrounding it. But fear not—it’s not as complicated as it seems, and anyone can learn the origins and history of Western art music. In addition to learning how better to understand (and enjoy!) classical music, The History of Classical Music For Beginners will help you will learn of some of the more interesting and sometimes comical stories behind the music and composers.

Did you know that Jean-Baptiste Lully actually died from conducting one of his own compositions? You may have heard of Gregorian chant, but did you know there are many forms of chant, including Ambrosian and Byzantine chant? And did you also know that only a small portion of “classical music” is even technically Classical?

These interesting, insightful facts and more are yours to discover in The History of Classical Music For Beginners
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About the author

R. Ryan Endris, D. Mus., currently serves as Assistant Professor of Music and Director of Choral Activities at Colgate University. He is also in demand as an arranger of choral and instrumental music throughout the country, and his arrangements have been heard by audiences around the world. Dr. Endris holds Doctor of Music and Master of Music of Choral Conducting degrees from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, as well as a Bachelor of Music Education (K-12 Choral/General Music). He has studied voice with internationally acclaimed soprano Sylvia McNair, and his conducting teachers and mentors include Robert Porco of the Cleveland Orchestra; John Poole of the BBC Singers; Dale Warland of the Dale Warland Singers; and Vance George, Director Emeritus of the San Francisco Symphony Chorus.

Joe Lee is an illustrator, cartoonist, writer, and clown. A graduate of Ringling Brothers, Barnum and Bailey’s Clown College, he worked for many years as a circus clown. He is the author and illustrator of Writers and Readers’ The History of Clowns For Beginners and Dante For Beginners, and the illustrator of many For Beginners books including: Dada & Surrealism For Beginners, Postmodernism For Beginners, and Shakespeare For Beginners. Joe lives with his wife, Mary Bess, three cats, and two dogs. 
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Additional Information

Publisher
Red Wheel/Weiser
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Published on
Oct 7, 2014
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Pages
176
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ISBN
9781939994271
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Language
English
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Genres
Music / Genres & Styles / Classical
Music / History & Criticism
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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What is rhetorical music? In The Pathetick Musician, Bruce Haynes and Geoffrey Burgess illustrate the vital place of rhetoric and eloquent expression in the creation and performance of Baroque music. Through engaging explorations of the cantatas of J.S. Bach, the authors explode the conventional notion of historical authenticity in music, proposing adventurous new directions to reinvigorate the performance of early music in the modern setting. Along the way, Haynes and Burgess investigate intersections between music and oratory, dance, gesture, poetry, painting and sculpture, and offer insights into figural elaboration, articulation, nuance and temporality. Aimed primarily at performers of Baroque music, the book situates the study of performance practice in a broader cultural context, and as much as an invaluable resource for advanced study, it contains a wealth of information that pertains directly to anyone working in the field of early music. Based on a draft sketched by celebrated Baroque oboist and early music scholar Bruce Haynes before his death in 2011, The Pathetick Musician is the fruit of the combined wisdom of two musicians renowned equally for their contributions as performers and scholars. Drawing on an impressive array of Classical treatises on oratory, musical autographs and performance accounts, it is an essential companion to Haynes' controversial The End of Early Music. Geoffrey Burgess has taken up the broader claims of Haynes' philosophy to create a practical, accessible text that will be stimulating for all musicians interested in the rediscovery of early music. With copious musical examples, contemporaneous works of art, and a companion website with supplementary audio recordings, The Pathetick Musician is an invaluable resource for all interested in exploring new expressive possibilities in the performance and study of Baroque music.
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