Beyond the Alamo: Forging Mexican Ethnicity in San Antonio, 1821-1861

Univ of North Carolina Press
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Introducing a new model for the transnational history of the United States, Raul Ramos places Mexican Americans at the center of the Texas creation story. He focuses on Mexican-Texan, or Tejano, society in a period of political transition beginning with the year of Mexican independence. Ramos explores the factors that helped shape the ethnic identity of the Tejano population, including cross-cultural contacts between Bexarenos, indigenous groups, and Anglo-Americans, as they negotiated the contingencies and pressures on the frontier of competing empires.

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About the author

Raul A. Ramos is assistant professor of history at the University of Houston.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Univ of North Carolina Press
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Published on
Nov 30, 2009
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Pages
320
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ISBN
9780807888933
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / State & Local / Southwest (AZ, NM, OK, TX)
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / Hispanic American Studies
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / Native American Studies
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This content is DRM protected.
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